Gene Demby 2013 i
Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Gene Demby 2013
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Gene Demby

Lead Blogger, Code Switch

Gene Demby is the lead blogger for NPR's Code Switch team.

Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post's BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics and media called PostBourgie, which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

Demby is an avid runner, mainly because he wants to stay alive long enough to finally see the Sixers and Eagles win championships in their respective sports. You can follow him on Twitter at @GeeDee215.

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 1: Can We Talk About Whiteness?

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Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shout at the media prior to a rally at the Charleston Civic Center on May 5 in Charleston, W.Va. Mark Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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It's Gotten A Lot Harder To Act Like Whiteness Doesn't Shape Our Politics

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Block associations on the South Side have long pushed to make their neighborhoods cleaner and safer, but investment from developers and retailers has been slow to follow. Bill Healy/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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Music director Alex Lacamoire and actor/composer Lin-Manuel Miranda celebrate onstage during a Hamilton performance for the Grammy Awards at Richard Rodgers Theater in New York on Feb. 15. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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The protest movement that has sprung up around police violence and criminal justice reform first spread like wildfire online, which researchers say allowed activists to circumvent traditional new media to get their message out. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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