Kirk Siegler
Kirk Siegler - 2016
Kirk Siegler

Kirk Siegler

Reporter, National Desk

A reporter on NPR's national desk since 2012, Kirk Siegler covers the urban-rural divide in America.

A beat exploring the intersection between urban and rural life, culture, and politics, Siegler has recently brought listeners and readers to a timber town in Idaho that lost its last sawmill just days before the 2016 election, as well as to small rural towns in Nebraska where police are fighting an influx in recreational marijuana coming from nearby Colorado cities.

Based at NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA, but frequently roaming the country, Siegler's reporting has also focused on the far-reaching economic impacts of the drought in the West while explaining the broader, national significance to many of the region's complex and bitter disputes around land use. His assignments have brought listeners to the heart of anti-government standoffs in Oregon and Nevada, including a rare interview with recalcitrant rancher Cliven Bundy in 2014.

Siegler also contributes extensively to the network's breaking news coverage. In 2015, he was awarded an International Reporting Project fellowship from Johns Hopkins University to report on health and development in Nepal. While en route to the country in April, the worst magnitude earthquake to hit the region in more than 80 years struck. Siegler was one of the first foreign journalists to arrive in Kathmandu and helped lead NPR's coverage of the immediate aftermath of the deadly quake. He also filed in-depth reports focusing on the humanitarian disaster and challenges of bringing relief to some of the Nepal's far-flung rural villages.

Prior to joining NPR, Siegler spent seven years reporting from Colorado, where he became a familiar voice to NPR listeners reporting on politics, water, and the state's ski industry from Denver for NPR Member Station KUNC. He got his start in political reporting covering the Montana Legislature for Montana Public Radio.

Apart from a brief stint working as a waiter in Sydney, Australia, Siegler has spent most of his adult life living in the West. He grew up near Missoula, Montana, and received a journalism degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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Interior Secretary-nominee Ryan Zinke, R-Mont., tells a Senate committee that if he is confirmed, he'll take President Theodore Roosevelt as his model for managing federal lands. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Powerful Storms Make Dent In California's Historic Drought

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Buzz Hettick scans federal Bureau of Land Management land near his home in Laramie, Wyo., scouting for an upcoming hunt. He worries the proposed transfer of federal lands to the states would jeopardize the public's access to these lands. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Push To Transfer Federal Lands To States Has Sportsmen On Edge

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Rep. Zinke Chosen To Head Interior, Published Reports Say

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Reports: Trump Nominates Rep. Ryan Zinke To Head Interior Department

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The Tri-Pro Forest Products facility in Orofino, Idaho, closed in October after operators said they didn't have a steady enough supply of logs to keep the sawmill running and profitable. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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In Idaho Lumber Country, Trump Voters Wait To See If He Can Jumpstart Jobs

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Flathead Lake in Montana's Flathead Valley is fed by the glaciers in Glacier National Park. Here in rural northwest Montana, there is postelection unease in some communities about far-right extremist views entering the mainstream. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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In Montana, An Unease Over Extremist Views Moving Out Of The Woods

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Election Results Are Still Coming Out Of Arizona

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Ammon Bundy, the leader of an anti-government militia, carries a copy of the U.S. Constitution in his pocket. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Bundy Militia Not Backing Down Following Oregon Trial Acquittal

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Jury Delivers Surprise Acquittal In Oregon Wildlife Refuge Occupation Trial

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Oregon Jury Acquits Defendants In Wildlife Refuge Occupation

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Native Americans march to a sacred burial ground site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land

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