Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
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Ron Elving 2017
Meg Kelly/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been a Distinguished Visiting Professional in Residence at American University, where he is now an adjunct professor. In this role, Elving received American University's 2016 University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown University.

He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as the manager of NPR's Washington coverage, NPR reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

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Story Archive

Abraham Lincoln warned that "A house divided against itself cannot stand." Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Racial Issues Have Often Been A Test for U.S. Presidents With Conflicted Feelings

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Week In Politics: Charlottesville, Bannon

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A History Of Rivals In The White House

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John Kelly, formerly President Trump's secretary of Homeland Security, is now his chief of staff. The retired general personifies The Pivot long sought by establishmentarians. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Week In Politics: Health Care And Priebus Out, Kelly In

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With President Trump in January: White House chief of staff Reince Priebus (from second left), Vice President Pence, chief strategist Steve Bannon, press secretary Sean Spicer and national security adviser Michael Flynn listen. Just six months later, only Bannon is still serving in the Trump-Pence administration. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Morning News Brief: Health Care, Transgender Service Members, Foxconn, Charlie Gard

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On Tuesday on the Senate floor, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., called for a return to "regular order": the traditional legislative process, with more bipartisanship. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Week In Politics: Spicer Resigns, Trump Looks At Pardons, Health Care

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President Trump Marks 6 Months In The White House

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