Mara Liasson 2010 i
Doby/NPR
Mara Liasson 2010
Doby/NPR

Mara Liasson

Correspondent, National Politics, Washington Desk

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered six presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

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Bernie Sanders announced his presidential bid Thursday. Though he'll challenge Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, his candidacy could actually help hers. Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Marco Rubio spoke at the an Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition meeting last weekend. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Rubio celebrates onstage with his family in 2010 after winning his U.S. Senate seat in Florida when he was just 39 years old. Now, he's expected to embark on a run for president. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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President Obama with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in 2013. The two have never had a warm and fuzzy relationship. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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