Cuba is 90 miles away from the southernmost point in the United States, in Key West, Fla. "There used to be a ferry that ran between the two islands every day," says 89-year-old Gregorio Garcia, who emigrated in 1958. "I hope they operate it again someday." Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Maria Isabel de la Paz, a U.S. citizen, was twice turned away when trying to enter the U.S. legally. When she attempted an illegal crossing, her case was decided by a Border Patrol agent, not an immigration judge. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett/NPR

Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett/NPR

The largest immigration detention center in the nation has just broken ground in Dilley, Texas. Some 2,400 women and children will be held in modular buildings and deported if their asylum claims fail. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett/NPR

Children enter a dormitory in the Artesia Family Residential Center in Artesia, N.M, in September. The center has been held up by the Obama administration as an example of the crackdown on illegal crossings from Central America. But civil rights advocates are suing the federal government, saying that lack of access to legal representation turned the center into a "deportation mill." Juan Carlos LLorca/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Carlos LLorca/AP

Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr

Agents at the Air and Marine Operations Center at an Air Force Reserve base in Riverside, Calif., track 20,000 to 25,000 flights a day for suspicious activity. Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC hide caption

itoggle caption Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC