The largest immigration detention center in the nation has just broken ground in Dilley, Texas. Some 2,400 women and children will be held in modular buildings and deported if their asylum claims fail. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett/NPR

Children enter a dormitory in the Artesia Family Residential Center in Artesia, N.M, in September. The center has been held up by the Obama administration as an example of the crackdown on illegal crossings from Central America. But civil rights advocates are suing the federal government, saying that lack of access to legal representation turned the center into a "deportation mill." Juan Carlos LLorca/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Carlos LLorca/AP

Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr

Agents at the Air and Marine Operations Center at an Air Force Reserve base in Riverside, Calif., track 20,000 to 25,000 flights a day for suspicious activity. Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC hide caption

itoggle caption Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC

More than 350 towns and cities in Texas have banned new billboards, but billboards companies are still pressing for new and taller signs. John Burnett hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett

Thanks to unusually heavy monsoon rains, mesa land east of Ghost Ranch in New Mexico has erupted into vibrant green life — an unusual sight in this region. courtesy Harvey Day hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy Harvey Day

Thousands of young immigrants, many of them from Central America, have crossed illegally into the United States this year, causing an unprecedented humanitarian crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Child detainees in a holding cell at a Border Patrol facility in Brownsville, Texas. Some human smugglers who bring children across the Rio Grande make sure to treat their clients well. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Gay/AP