Emily Harris i

Emily Harris Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Emily Harris

Emily Harris

Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Emily Harris

International Correspondent, Jerusalem

International Correspondent Emily Harris is based in Jerusalem as part of NPR's Mideast team. Her post covers news related to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. She began this role in March of 2013.

Over her career, Harris has served in multiple roles within public media. She first joined NPR in 2000, as a general assignment reporter. A prolific reporter often filing two stories a day, Harris covered major stories including 9/11 and its aftermath, including the impact on the airline industry; and the anthrax attacks. She also covered how policies set in Washington are implemented across the country.

In 2002, Harris worked as a Special Correspondent on NOW with Bill Moyer, focusing on investigative storytelling. In 2003 Harris became NPR's Berlin Correspondent, covering Central and Eastern Europe. In that role, she reported regularly from Iraq, leading her to be a key member of the NPR team awarded a 2005 Peabody Award for coverage of the region.

Harris left NPR in December 2007 to become a host for a live daily program, Think Out Loud, on Oregon Public Broadcasting. Under her leadership Harris's team received three back to back Gracie Awards for Outstanding Talk Show, and a share in OPB's 2009 Peabody Award for the series "Hard Times." Harris's other awards include the RIAS Berlin Commission's first-place radio award in 2007 and second-place in 2006. She was a John S. Knight fellow at Stanford University in 2005-2006.

A seasoned reporter, she was asked to help train young journalist through NPR's "Next Generation" program. She also served as editorial director for Journalism Accelerator, a project to bring journalists together to share ideas and experiences; and was a writer-in-residence teaching radio writing to high school students.

One of the aspects of her work that most intrigues her is why people change their minds and what inspires them to do so.

Outside of work, Harris has drafted a screenplay about the Iraq war and for another project is collecting stories about the most difficult parts of parenting.

She has a B.A. in Russian Studies from Yale University.

[+] read more[-] less

A kindergarten teacher in Jerusalem stands with students as they listen to sirens that played nationwide on Thursday to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day. This year, a new national Holocaust curriculum is being fully implemented in kindergarten. Ellen Krosney for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ellen Krosney for NPR
In Israeli Kindergartens, An Early Lesson In The Holocaust
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476912786/476927421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mother (right) of Abdel Hamid Abu Srour (portrait) mourns with family members as she receives condolences at the Al-Ruwad Center in the Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem on Friday. Musa Al Shaer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Musa Al Shaer/AFP/Getty Images
Is This Week's Jerusalem Suicide Bombing A Warning Of More To Come?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475274701/475388760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Security Concerns Heighten After Bus Explosion In Jerusalem
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474725607/474725608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Violence Threatens Relations Between Israeli-Palestinian Security Forces
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474050049/474050050" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Israeli soldiers watch as a machine drills holes on the Israeli side of the border with the Gaza Strip, as they search for tunnels reportedly used by Hamas for fighting Israel, on Feb. 10. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images
The View Of Gaza, On 24/7 Video
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473514419/473623593" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A view of Gaza City's Shujaya neighborhood shows this rebuilt home surrounded by others that were destroyed in 2014 and have not yet been reconstructed. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Harris/NPR
In Gaza, A Few New, Shiny Homes Rise Amid The Rubble
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473089337/473139326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arab-Israeli colleagues react to the departure of the last Palestinian SodaStream employees from the company's plant in the Israeli city of Rahat on Feb. 29. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images
When 500 Palestinians Lose Their Jobs At SodaStream, Who's To Blame?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471885452/472035989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Israeli Woman Describes Journey From Criticizing Settlers To Becoming One
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471622110/471622111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bassam Aramin, 46, grew up hating Israel and spent seven years in an Israeli prison. But he gradually came to believe that negotiation, not violence, was the only way to resolve the conflict. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Harris/NPR
A Palestinian Takes A Different Road In His Fight
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467689134/471474842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Moment When An Israeli Soldier Saw Himself Through A Palestinian Child's Eyes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471389495/471389496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript