Greg Allen Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features.
Doby Photography /NPR
Greg Allen 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

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Story Archive

Charities are canceling plans for fundraising events at President Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club. The cancellations come in the wake of his controversial comments about the events in Charlottesville, Va. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sessions Continues To Criticize Sanctuary Cities During His Visit To Miami

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Overdoses from heroin and other opioids have led six states to declare public health emergencies. Marianne Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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From Alaska To Florida, States Respond To Opioid Crisis With Emergency Declarations

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A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen /NPR hide caption

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Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

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Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

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The Trump helicopter is seen at the Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla., in April. The president's club is requesting foreign worker visas to staff up during peak season. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Venezuelans Who Fled To Florida Participate In Opposition's Symbolic Vote

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American Cruise Companies Stand To Benefit From U.S. Changes To Cuba Policy

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Florida Swaps Out Septic Tanks For Sewers To Fight Coastal Pollution

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Country's Mayors Gather In Miami To Advocate For Cities

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Venezuela's Government Cracks Down On Shipments From U.S. Amid Crisis

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FEMA Confronts Financial Uncertainty Heading Into Active Hurricane Season

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