Greg Allen 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Greg Allen 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

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Florida Gov. Scott Tries To Attract Businesses To The Sunshine State
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Congress Considers Plan To Restructure Puerto Rico's $72 Billion Debt
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Trump Supporters Criticize Delegate Selection Process In Florida
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A view of the beach known as "La Selva," part of the Northeast Ecological Corridor reserve, in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. Andres Leighton/AP hide caption

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Grass-Roots Fight To Protect Puerto Rico's Coast Scores Environmental Prize
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Rachelle Ianelli (left) and Austin Jacobs (middle) both archaeological students from University of Florida, together with Florida Public Archaeology Network representative Rachael Kangas, excavate a section at "Garden Patch," a settlement populated after rising seas forced people to leave Bird Island. Neill Wallis/University of Florida hide caption

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What Can We Learn From Early Floridians On Sea-Level Rise?
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A security guard stands at the gate of the Governor's Mansion, known as the La Fortaleza, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Trainers (from left) Joe Sanchez, Brian Faulkner and Kelly Aldrich work with orcas Trua (front to back) Kayla and Nalani during the "Believe" show in Shamu Stadium at the Aquatica by SeaWorld theme park in Orlando, Fla., in 2011. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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SeaWorld Agrees To End Captive Breeding Of Killer Whales
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A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded
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Nuclear Plant Threatens Miami-Dade's Water. Mayor Says, 'This Isn't Flint'
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Blue skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico belie the U.S. territory's struggle with massive debt. The islands have a generous health care program that covers nearly everyone, but economists say it has never been adequately funded. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Puerto Rico's Growing Financial Crisis Threatens Health Care, Too
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Mosquito larvae fill the cup of stale water that entomologist Luis Hernandez dips from a stack of old tires in a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico Races To Stop Zika's Mosquitoes Before Rains Begin
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Previous experience with dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico has shown that even small amounts of standing water — as in the vases of cemeteries — can serve as breeding areas for the mosquitoes that carry dengue and Zika. Pan American Health Organization/Flickr hide caption

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With CDC Help, Puerto Rico Aims To Get Ahead Of Zika
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Puerto Rico Waits To See If Zika Scares Off Tourists
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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again
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