Nouf al-Mazrou, with the red head scarf in the center, runs a barbeque catering business from her home in the Saudi capital Riyadh. She's shown here at a gathering of Saudi women who have launched businesses on Instagram. The event was held at a private girls school. Deborah Amos / NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deborah Amos / NPR

Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year. Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Syrian children listen to a teacher during a lesson in a temporary classroom in Suruc refugee camp on March 25 in Suruc, Turkey. The camp is the largest of its kind in Turkey with a population of about 35,000 Syrians who have fled the ongoing civil war in their country. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Awad Al-Yami, an art therapist trained at the University of Pennsylvania, is a counselor at a Saudi Arabian center that seeks to rehabilitate convicted terrorists. The center claims a success rate of more than 80 percent, but acknowledges that some return to extremist groups like al-Qaida. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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A Houthi Shiite fighter stands guard as people search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa airport in Yemen on Thursday. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Kurdish peshmerga fighters keep watch during the battle with Islamic State militants on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 21. Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov

Shiite fighters and Sunni fighters, who have joined Shiite militia groups known collectively as Hashid Shaabi ("Popular Mobilization") to fight the Islamic State, gesture Tuesday next to former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces in the Iraqi town of Ouja, near Tikrit. Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov

Dura Europos, a Roman walled city in eastern Syria, dates back to 330 B.C. The main gate is shown here in a photo from 2010. It's one of the many important archaeological sites militants of the self-styled Islamic State have ransacked and damaged. EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov

Members of a Saudi women's soccer team, Rana Al Khateeb (left) and captain Rawh Abdullah, practice at a secret location in the capital Riyadh in 2012. Saudi women have had only rare opportunities to play sports. The country sent women to the Olympics for the first time in 2012 and now girls will be allowed to take physical education classes at public schools. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Hassan Ammar/AP

These pop-up targets are part of an advanced drill, named "friend or foe," that tests shooter reaction times. Some targets have a camera, and others, like these pictured, have a gun. The shooter must decide within seconds whether to shoot. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Syrian volunteers cover mosaics in the Ma'arra museum with a protective layer of glue, covered by cloth. Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project hide caption

itoggle caption Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project

Saudi women, shown here at a cultural festival near the capital Riyadh on Sunday, still need the permission of male relatives to travel and even receive certain medical procedures, but a growing number are entering the workforce. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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