Relatives of Abdelwahab Zaydoun, a 27-year-old Moroccan who set himself on fire to protest his unemployment and died from his burns, react to his death in Casablanca last month. A year after street protests in Morocco prompted some reforms, Moroccans remain discontent with the gap between rich and poor, and the slow strides toward democracy. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

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In Morocco, The Arab Spring's Mixed Bounty

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This week marks the 30th anniversary of the Hama massacre of 1982 in central Syria. According to Abu Aljude, who was 16 at the time, these images are documentation of the destruction by President Hafez Assad's regime. In this image, Aljude identifies a bombed Christian church. Courtesy of Abu Jade hide caption

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Demonstrators carry posters of Abdelwahab Zaydoun, who set himself on fire and died from his burns Tuesday. Zaydoun was part of a movement protesting unemployment in Morocco. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

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In Morocco, Unemployment Can Be A Full-Time Job

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Morocco's Islamist Justice and Development Party heads the country's new government, the result of snap elections called by the king. Here, Abdelilah Benkirane, the party's secretary general and now prime minister, arrives for an election rally in Sale on Nov. 1. The party now faces political as well as economic challenges. Paul Schemm/AP hide caption

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In Morocco, Islamists Learn To Work With A King

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Morocco's King Mohammed VI introduced reforms after protests began last February. But activists say the measures didn't go far enough and they are still taking to the streets. Here, the king is shown in his palace in Rabat on June 17. Azzouz Boukallouch/AP hide caption

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For Moroccan Activists, The King's Reforms Fall Short

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Resolve Of Syria's Pro-Government Forces Hardens

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The U.S. is still trying to formulate new policies for the fast-changing politics of the Middle East. Here, Hillary Clinton stands with Libyan fighters who ousted Moammar Gadhafi during an Oct. 18 visit by the U.S. secretary of state to the capital Tripoli. Kevin Lamarque/AFP/Getty Images) hide caption

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Is The Arab Spring Good Or Bad For The U.S.?

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Moroccan rapper Mouad Belrhouate, shown here on an album cover, is commonly known as El-Haqed, or "the defiant one." He's been jailed for four months and is awaiting trial in Casablanca. His supporters say his case shows the limits of recent political changes introduced by King Mohammed VI. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Rapper's Imprisonment Tests Moroccan Reforms

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Syria's embattled President Bashar Assad still has supporters, particularly among his fellow Alawites, a minority who believe they will suffer if Assad is ousted. Here, Assad supporters rally Tuesday in the capital, Damascus. SANA handout/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Syrian Uprising Raises The Specter Of Sectarian War

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Qatar Emerges As Major Force In Arab World

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In this frame grab from an amateur video posted on YouTube, members of the Arab League monitor violence in the Syrian city of Homs this week. YouTube hide caption

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In Syria, Arab League Observers Caught In Crossfire

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Arab League Monitors Visit Besieged Syrian City

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Syrian security forces shot Rabih al-Zain, a 30-year-old Syrian, while he was trying to help wounded civilians in Homs, Syria. Doctors and ordinary Syrians and Lebanese are helping treat the wounded, putting their own safety at risk. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Doctors Risk Their Lives To Treat Syrian Protesters

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