Deborah Amos
Steve Barrett/N/A

Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Life Time Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos was returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a Break thru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World
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Osama and Ghada sit on the deck of their home in Princeton, N.J. They and their children are refugees from Syria and have been resettled with help from the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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After Trump's Election, Uncertainty For Syrian Refugees In The U.S.

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Syrian Refugee Father Shares His Story With Help Of U.S. Veteran

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A counterdemonstrator holds a sign during a gathering in New York City to show solidarity with Syrian and Iraqi refugees last year. Donald Trump's hard-line campaign rhetoric singled out Syrian refugees. "If I win," he told a New Hampshire rally, "they are going back." Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Refugees And Advocates, An Anxious Wait For Clarity On Trump's Policy

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Marsha Lewis, a semi-retired teacher, is one of the volunteers helping Syrian refugee Fadi al-Asmi, standing in the kitchen of Hartford's City Steam Brewery. Asmi, who co-owned a pastry shop in Damascus, now makes desserts at this Hartford cafe. Courtesy of Richard Groothuis hide caption

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Courtesy of Richard Groothuis

For Syrian Refugees In Connecticut, A Helping Hand From Private Volunteers

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Marcell Shehwaro, 32, is the executive director of Kesh Malek, a Syrian group that runs schools in opposition-held areas of Aleppo. The unofficial schools hold classes in basements to protect the children, who don't go outside to play because of the the risk of being hit by bombs or ground fire. She was recently at the United Nations, lobbying world leaders to stop the attacks on Aleppo. Neil Hall/Reuters hide caption

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Refugee Summit Held On Sidelines Of U.N. General Assembly Meeting

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U.S. Shifts Focus To Refugee Crisis At U.N. General Assembly

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Ghada and Osama sit on their deck in their new home in Princeton, N.J. Their family has been resettled from Syria and is being sponsored by the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Due to security concerns we are only including first names. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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Syrian Refugee Gets Free Dental Care From A Dentist Who Also Was A Refugee

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Syrian Refugee Family Knows English Is The Key To Independence

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N.J. Church Group To Resettle Syrian Refugee Family With Special Needs

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Syrian Refugee Family Arrives In New Jersey To Start New Life

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Bombing At Turkish Wedding Raises Questions About Country's Stability

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A volunteer at the the Dar-ul-Islam mosque in Elizabeth, N.J., prepares for a party to welcome refugees. More than 50 newly arrived Syrian women and children were invited to the party. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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At A New Jersey Mosque, People Of Different Faiths Welcome Syrians

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Syrian Refugees Get Oriented To The Ways Of American Life

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