Deborah Amos
Steve Barrett/N/A

Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Life Time Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos was returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a Break thru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Story Archive

Dr. Hussam Jefee-Bahloul, right, reads one of his poems for Ta'sheeq, a project he founded to help Syrian poets and artists share their experiences. Artiom Maksimov/Courtesy of Ta'sheeq hide caption

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Artiom Maksimov/Courtesy of Ta'sheeq

Archaeologists In Syria Use 'Data Water' To Confound Antiquities Smugglers

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Syrian Psychiatrist In The U.S. Uses Online Platform To Help Mental Health Workers

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HIAS, a Jewish group that supports refugee resettlement, held a rally against President Trump's immigration ban on Feb. 12 in New York City. The group worries that giving governors the power to veto arrivals — something President Trump wants to do that last week's court ruling did not address — could unravel the resettlement program. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Administration Considers Ways To Up Vetting Of Refugees

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Protesters at Los Angeles International Airport rally Sunday against President Trump's executive order halting entry of refugees and others into the U.S. Amanda Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Takes Action To Cut Flow Of Refugees Entering U.S.

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Trump Signs Executive Action To Impose 'New Vetting Measures' For Refugees

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When the leaders of Rutland, Vt., decided to host Syrian refugees, it made them a target of a national effort to oppose refugee settlement. Nina Keck/VPR hide caption

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A Vermont Town In The Eye Of The Refugee Resettlement Storm

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Employees hand-finish cheesecakes on the production line at Eli's in Chicago. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Refugees Resettled In Chicago Help Make Its Most Famous Cheesecake

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Almothana Alhamoud (second from left) with his family in Chicago. From left to right are his sister, Fatina; their father, Abdel Bari; their mother, Alia; and his other sister, Rowan. Alhamoud earned a computer engineering degree in Syria, but when he came to the U.S., he initially worked as a cashier. The group Upwardly Global helped him find a job in IT. Deb Amos/NPR hide caption

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How One U.S. Group Turns Migrants Into Employees

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Osama and Ghada sit on the deck of their home in Princeton, N.J. They and their children are refugees from Syria and have been resettled with help from the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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After Trump's Election, Uncertainty For Syrian Refugees In The U.S.

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Syrian Refugee Father Shares His Story With Help Of U.S. Veteran

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A counterdemonstrator holds a sign during a gathering in New York City to show solidarity with Syrian and Iraqi refugees last year. Donald Trump's hard-line campaign rhetoric singled out Syrian refugees. "If I win," he told a New Hampshire rally, "they are going back." Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Refugees And Advocates, An Anxious Wait For Clarity On Trump's Policy

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