Is this coffee shop going to grow to be the next Starbucks? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Traders at the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday. Stocks surged on Wall Street after Senate leaders reached a deal that would avoid a U.S. default and reopen the government after 16 days of being partially shut down. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Toll Brothers luxury homes are shown sold before construction is completed in Oceanside, Calif. On Wednesday, Toll Brothers reported a 24 percent jump in quarterly revenue due to higher home prices. Mike Blake/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Mike Blake/Reuters /Landov

Carpenters work on a housing site in Brandywine, Md., on May 31. Pent-up demand for homes could create jobs and help the struggling U.S. economy. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress about the program in 2010. Barofsky now says of the financial crisis: "The folks responsible for this incredibly painful economic damage that struck our economy have gone free." Harry Hamburg/AP hide caption

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Many economists are encouraged by the latest jobs report because the stronger growth doesn't appear to be just a one-month blip. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Lobsterman Genevieve Kurilec holds a lobster caught while fishing along Deer Isle, Maine. Kurilec says more women are beginning to captain their own lobster boats. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Sara Millan (left) thanks Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America CEO Bruce Marks after NACA was able to reduce her family's mortgage during an event in Los Angeles in September 2010. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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As lobster prices plunge, scallops offer fishermen an alternative to make money. Levi Bridges for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Levi Bridges for NPR

Many experts say reducing mortgage principal can help troubled homeowners avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes. But the regulator who oversees two of the nation's largest mortgage holders, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, has rejected the idea. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Created by the federal government during the Great Depression, Fannie Mae became a Washington powerhouse: a highly profitable, private company, protected by the government and boasting huge lobbying clout. But today, Fannie Mae has essentially become a ward of the state. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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The housing market is finally showing signs of a comeback, according to an annual study from Harvard. But, though mortgage interest rates are at record lows, banks are often too cautious to lend. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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