Chris Arnold NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Bank Settlement Could Spur More Foreclosures

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A counselor (right) talks with a man about training programs at a nonprofit training and job placement center in Menlo Park, Calif. Seventy percent of the long-term unemployed and underemployed would like the government to offer more job training services, an NPR/Kaiser Family Foundation poll found. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Changes In The Economy Leave Workers Scrambling

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As Governor, Romney Balanced Budget By Hiking Fees

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Triple-A: Are Any Assets Truly Risk-Free These Days?

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Lower Unemployment May Paint Incomplete Picture

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Wharton Professor Cautions FHA May Need A Bailout

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Attorney Gary Klein in Boston is suing the largest U.S. banks on behalf of thousands of homeowners whom he says the banks wrongfully pushed into foreclosure. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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After Banks' Mistakes, Homeowners Pick Up Pieces

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Trucking Gives Reason For Economic Optimism

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Occupy Boston protesters congregate across the street from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

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Frustration Over Jobs Unites 'Occupiers' In Boston

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A truck stop near Hesperia, Calif. To address a shortage of truck drivers resulting from a mismatch of skills in the labor market, some trucking companies have started free driving schools with the promise of a job upon completion.

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A Labor Mismatch Means Trucking Jobs Go Unfilled

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SawStop, a table saw safety tool, senses an electrical current in skin and triggers a brake when a finger comes into contact with the blade. Courtesy of SawStop hide caption

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Courtesy of SawStop

Regulators Consider Safety Brakes For Table Saws

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Economists At Annual Retreat Weigh In On Wall St.

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Supreme Court Blocks Climate Change Lawsuit

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Thomas Siwek, director of product safety at Robert Bosch Tool Corp., demonstrates a newly designed guard for table saws at a meeting with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Industry officials say the new guards make the saws safe. But consumer advocates disagree and are pushing for flesh-sensing technology such as SawStop, which they say will virtually eliminate the worst table saw injuries. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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If Table Saws Can Be Safer, Why Aren't They?

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