Mel Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, says many homeowners who could qualify to refinance their mortgages under HARP are suspicious. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Homebuilding remains slumped at levels not seen since WWII. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Economy

Housing Market Fake-Outs Stump Economists

More than six years after the housing crash, the housing market may be better-than-dismal, but the slog back to normal is still disappointingly long and slow.

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Marissa Szabo, 26, and her boyfriend are moving into Szabo's mother's house. The couple is saving up for a down payment. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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The Homer City Generating Station in Homer City, Pa. Republicans say the Environmental Protection Agency will kill jobs and raise electricity prices with new carbon emissions limits. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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De Desharnais of Ashwood Development in New Hampshire says homebuilding activity for her company has slowed sharply since the housing crash. But she's hopeful that business will pick up. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Senate Banking Committee Chairman Tim Johnson, D-S.D., (left) and ranking member Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, are proposing a major overhaul of the U.S. mortgage market. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Jungmann, vice president at the tech startup Quanttus, holds up an early prototype of the biometric sensors the company will use on its wearable products. The current version is much smaller. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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