Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

[+] read more[-] less

This shark may look menacing, but sautee it and drizzle some lemon caper sauce on top, and this dogfish becomes doggone delicious. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Would You Eat This Fish? A Shark Called Dogfish Makes A Tasty Taco

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/508538671/508668113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Guidelines Recommend When To Introduce Peanuts To Babies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/508408462/508408463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Which eating plan will work with your lifestyle and help you lose weight? U.S.News & World Report has plenty of advice with its latest diet rankings. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

NPR's Book Concierge To The Rescue With Last-Minute Gift Ideas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506849914/506849915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

How Much Is Too Much? New Study Casts Doubts On Sugar Guidelines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505867535/506200023" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

If you haven't had at least seven hours of sleep in the last 24, you probably shouldn't be behind the wheel, traffic safety data suggests. Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images

Drivers Beware: Crash Rate Spikes With Every Hour Of Lost Sleep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504448639/504590511" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Despite assumptions that peanut, egg and other allergies are becoming more common in the U.S., experts say they just don't know. One challenge: Symptoms can be misinterpreted and diagnosis isn't easy. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Scott/Getty Images

Are Food Allergies On The Rise? Experts Say They Don't Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503899747/503904927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Narragansett turkeys have free range of 12 acres on Dana Kee's Moose Manor Farm, located along the Potomac River in Maryland. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Heritage Turkeys Make A Comeback, But To Save Them We Must Eat Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502929415/503182818" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Student Nicola Hopper, 11, and Jake Hensley, 11, load milk cartons and other food collected by students at Franklin Sherman Elementary School into crates to be taken across the street to Share food pantry at McLean Baptist Church. Victoria Milko/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Victoria Milko/NPR

When Food Banks Say No To Sugary Junk, Schools Offer A Solution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502864004/503108972" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in San Francisco, Calif. The city is one of three in California, and four in the U.S., that passed taxes on sodas and other sugary drinks in Tuesday's election. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Souring On Sweet? Voters In 4 Cities Pass Soda Tax Measures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501472007/502274885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in 2014 in San Francisco. The city is one of several in California that have a soda tax on the ballot this November. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trick Or Treat? Critics Blast Big Soda's Efforts To Fend Off Taxes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498589273/498728535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Soda Industry Tries To Woo Public Health Groups With Sponsorship Deals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498582189/498582190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

PepsiCo, the multinational soda company, just announced that it will cut back the sugar content of its beverages by 2025. The announcement comes after increasing attention on the role of sugar in obesity. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

Diet Coke for sale in a Chinese supermarket. A new World Health Organization report recommends that nations adopt fiscal policies, including taxes, that raise the retail price of sugary drinks to fend off obesity and diabetes — and the health care costs that go with them. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images