Doughnuts at a Krispy Kreme store in Washington, D.C. An environmental coalition says leading doughnut companies like Krispy Kreme source palm oil from suppliers who are clear-cutting rain forests and destroying wildlife habitat. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Bolthouse Farms helped pave the way for using Mountain Dew-style tactics to sell healthy foods, like this ad for baby carrots. It was a wake-up call for the rest of the food industry. Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP hide caption

itoggle caption Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP

Going, going, gone. You won't find azodicarbonamide in Nature's Own products. And Subway is phasing it out, too. But lots of manufacturers are still using the additive. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meg Vogel/NPR

A new study linking animal protein-rich diets to increased mortality in middle age adds fuel to the controversy over how much protein — and from what sources — is ideal for health. One thing that seems pretty clear: It doesn't hurt to go heavy on the greens. iStockphoto hide caption

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Lunch with oysters and wine by Frans van Mieris, 1635-1681. Universal Images Group/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Last year, Long John Silver's Big Catch platter — which contained a whopping 33 grams of trans fats — won the dubious distinction of "worst restaurant meal in America" from a health watchdog group. Now, the fast-food chain says it has ditched the unhealthful fats from its menu. Tom Spaulding/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Tom Spaulding/Flickr

A study found that a Mediterranean diet with extra nuts and olive oil was associated with a lower risk of a cardiovascular condition called peripheral artery disease. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Heather Rousseau/NPR