Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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People who don't get enough sleep show higher levels of inflammation, say scientists who study colds. Smoking, chronic stress and lack of exercise can make you more susceptible to the viruses, too. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis hide caption

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Eat fish or take a fish oil supplement? Research suggests eating fish regularly over a lifetime is good for the brain. But when it comes to staving off cognitive decline in seniors, fish oil supplements just don't cut it, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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The McDonald's inside the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, in 2004. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Communal meals are woven into our DNA. But eating alone is no longer a social taboo. iStockphoto hide caption

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A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Everything Bagel: This yogurt from Sohha Savory Yogurt comes topped with roasted pine nuts, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion and extra virgin olive oil. Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt hide caption

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Scientists have documented that beneficial microorganisms play a critical role in how our bodies function. And it's becoming clear that the influence goes beyond the gut — researchers are turning their attention to our emotional health. iStockphoto hide caption

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For 15 years, Jared Fogle has been the famous face of Subway. Here, Fogle (left) visits a Subway shop in Daytona Beach, Fla., with NASCAR driver Carl Edwards in 2012. Brian Blanco/AP hide caption

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A quartet of tea-infused treats. Clockwise from left: Pastry chef's Naomi Gallego's old-fashioned doughnuts, flavored with Earl Grey; chocolate custard infused with jasmine tea, topped with a whipped cream ganache with a bit of lemon; berry scones with a hint of black berry tea; and blue French-style macarons made with lapsang souchong. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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