How does your child's spoonful of medicine measure up? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why It's So Easy To Give Kids The Wrong Dose Of Medicine

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Cycling has at least tripled over the past two decades in several big cities across the U.S., including Minneapolis, Chicago and San Francisco. Jonathan Steinberg hide caption

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Switching Gears: More Commuters Bike To Work

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Monica Hanson (top left) is the eldest of four daughters and says she fell into the role of firstborn naturally. Her sisters (from left to right) are Elena Lynn, Maria Godoy (a senior editor at NPR.org) and Olga Czekalski. Also pictured (bottom left) is her daughter, Erica, and Erica's cousins Kelsey and Taylor Lynn. Courtesy of Monica Hanson hide caption

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How Much Does Birth Order Shape Our Lives?

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Zac Visco for NPR

Bow Down To The Medicinal Power Of Cranberries

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Researchers from Yale University found that kids are seeing more fast food ads than ever before. Jonathan Barnes/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Fast Food Ads For Kids Up Despite Industry Vow

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A jogger passes two women napping on the National Mall near the U.S. Capitol. Regular exercise may reduce the chance of getting a cold. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Stepping Up Exercise Could Help Beat The Cold Virus

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Researchers are looking at ways to get kids to pick healthier foods in their school cafeterias. One middle school found that when they put chocolate milk 6 inches behind white milk, many kids suddenly opted for the white milk instead. The school pictured wasn't involved in the study. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Stealth Health: Nudging Kids Toward A Better Diet

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Peter Sherry demonstrates a hamstring stretch. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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For Runners, Static Stretching May Be Outdated

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Bee colonies across the country are dying because of colony collapse disorder, and researchers say a combination of a virus and a fungus could be playing a key role in the bees' sickness. Christopher Tompkins/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Study Links Honeybee Deaths To Fungus, Insect Virus

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Carrot farmers are banking on a $25 million ad campaign to make carrots as cool as junk food. Crispin Porter + Bogusky via AP hide caption

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Extreme Baby Carrots: An Experiment In Marketing

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Rachel Bateman, 9, has braces to correct an overbite. Her orthodontist opted not to use expanders to expand her upper arch. Mike Ruocco/NPR hide caption

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Braces For Young Kids Might Not Always Be Best

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This computer illustration shows a kidney stone in the renal pelvis. Although a major component of kidney stones is calcum, a new study shows that a calcium-rich diet may help inhibit their development. 3D Clinic/Getty Images hide caption

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This Too Shall Pass: Avoid Kidney Stones Through Diet

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