Nutrition researchers are reaching a new consensus: Cut back on all those refined carbs. And remember that some fat is good. Stacy Spensley/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Stacy Spensley/Flickr

The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies. Youtube and RetroJunk hide caption

itoggle caption Youtube and RetroJunk

Eating some foods high in saturated fat is not necessarily going to increase your risk of heart disease, a study shows, contrary to the dietary science of the past 40 years. Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto

Bolthouse Farms helped pave the way for using Mountain Dew-style tactics to sell healthy foods, like this ad for baby carrots. It was a wake-up call for the rest of the food industry. Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP hide caption

itoggle caption Crispin Porter Bogusky via AP

Going, going, gone. You won't find azodicarbonamide in Nature's Own products. And Subway is phasing it out, too. But lots of manufacturers are still using the additive. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meg Vogel/NPR

A new study linking animal protein-rich diets to increased mortality in middle age adds fuel to the controversy over how much protein — and from what sources — is ideal for health. One thing that seems pretty clear: It doesn't hurt to go heavy on the greens. iStockphoto hide caption

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The proposed Nutrition Facts label (right) has a few subtle differences from the current label, including bolder calorie counts and added sugar information. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

itoggle caption Food and Drug Administration

Kellogg, maker of Pop-Tarts, announced Feb. 14 that it will buy palm oil — an ingredient in Pop-Tarts — only from companies that don't destroy rain forests where palm trees are grown. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Lunch with oysters and wine by Frans van Mieris, 1635-1681. Universal Images Group/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Universal Images Group/UIG via Getty Images

A customer shops for milk at a Safeway in Livermore, Calif. Although it may seem counterintuitive, there's growing evidence that full-fat dairy is linked to reduced body weight. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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