Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.

Various food items that contained trans fats in November 2013. That month, the Food and Drug Administration first announced plans to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products. A final rule is expected any day now. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Adios, Trans Fats: FDA Poised To Phase Out Artery-Clogging Fat

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The White House announced an action plan Tuesday aimed at reversing dramatic declines in pollinators like honeybees, which play a vital role in agriculture, pollinating everything from apples and almonds to squash. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pollinator Politics: Environmentalists Criticize Obama Plan To Save Bees

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Kale is not only loaded with nutrients, but it's become a emblem of a healthy lifestyle that's increasingly appealing to Americans ready to move away from processed, high-calorie food. Peet Sneekes/Flickr hide caption

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Peet Sneekes/Flickr

From Scornin' It To Lovin' It: McDonald's Tests Out Kale On Its Menu

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A whole range of foods in common in the Mediterranean diet — from fish to nuts to fruits and vegetables — are rich in antioxidants and may protect against cognitive decline. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Brain Boost: Mediterranean Diet May Fend Off Memory Loss

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A pedestrian walks by a Panera Bread restaurant on June 3 in San Francisco. Panera Bread is set to remove artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and preservatives from items on its menu by the end of 2016. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Panera Is The Latest To Drop Artificial Ingredients From Its Food

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A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon. iStockphoto hide caption

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Tylenol Might Dull Emotional Pain, Too

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The salty suspects: Some 70 percent of the cheeses, soups, cold cuts and pizzas we buy at the grocery store exceed the Food and Drug Administration's "healthy" labeling standards for salt. Since we eat so much bread, it is — perhaps surprisingly — the top contributor of sodium to our diets. iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr hide caption

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iStockphoto; Deborah Austin/Flickr; Beckman's Bakery/Flickr; iStockphoto; The Pizza Review/Flickr

GNC Announces New Policy After Facing Scrutiny Over Mislabeled Products

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"There's no reason to believe that exposure to arsenic in food and wine is above levels that are considered to be safe," says Susan Ebeler, a professor and chemist in the Foods For Health Institute at the University of California, Davis. Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS