Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Frances Moore Lappe speaks at a Rainforest Action Network event. When she wrote the best-selling Diet For A Small Planet back in 1971, she helped start a conversation about the social and environmental impacts of the foods we choose. Rainforest Action Network/Flickr hide caption

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Rainforest Action Network/Flickr

If You Think Eating Is A Political Act, Say Thanks To Frances Moore Lappe

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Berlin has become a vegan mecca, with ice cream shops like Kontor Eismanufaktur Berlin (pictured here), restaurants and even butchers catering to a plant-based diet. Now Germany's nutritionists warn that a vegan diet can't provide all a body needs. Courtesy of Susan Stone hide caption

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Courtesy of Susan Stone

Can A Vegan Diet Give You All You Need? German Nutritionists Say 'Nein'

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Organic Gatorade? The artificial colors may be gone, but it's still loaded with sugar. Gatorade hide caption

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Gatorade

Organic Gatorade: It's Still Loaded With Sugar, Folks

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Researchers are recruiting volunteers to participate in a four-year study trial of cocoa extract. Half of the participants will take capsules containing about as much cocoa extract as you'd get from eating about 1,000 calories of dark chocolate. Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images hide caption

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Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images

A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

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Pacific white shrimp raised in Eco Shrimp Garden's indoor aqua farm in New York's Hudson Valley, which owner Jean Claude Frajmund describes as a spa for shrimp. They grow for six months before they're ready for harvest. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Indoor Shrimp Production Opens New Possibilities For Food

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Unrest And Protest In Milwaukee After Police Shooting

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Activists Gather To Push For $15 Federal Minimum Wage

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Care To Offset All Your Office Sitting? It'll Take Just An Hour A Day

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Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

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A 12-ounce bottle of Stella Artois contains 150 calories whereas a bottle of Budweiser Select, only 120. davidgsteadman/Flickr hide caption

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davidgsteadman/Flickr

Beer Bottles Will Soon Include A Reality Check: A Calorie Count

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Surplus corn is piled outside a storage silo in Paoli, Colo. Do federal farm subsidies encourage the production — and perhaps overconsumption — of things that we're told to eat less of, like high fructose corn syrup or meat produced from livestock raised on subsidized grains? Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images