Allison Aubrey - 2015 i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk
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Study Finds Climate Change Could Be Leading To Better Wine
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Elizabeth Bennett, director of partnerships for Together We Bake, and Nikki Yates, program participant, place cookie dough they've just made onto baking sheets. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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This Bakery Offers A Second Chance For Women After Prison
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A bee gathers pollen from a park in Kensington, Md. With bee health in mind, home and garden products giant Ortho has announced it will phase out neonics, a class of pesticides, from its outdoor products. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Home And Garden Giant Ditches Class Of Pesticides That May Harm Bees
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A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Unless Congress or a federal court intervene, Vermont's new GMO labeling law will go into effect in July. So some companies are scrambling to comply. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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How Little Vermont Got Big Food Companies To Label GMOs
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Senate Blocks Bill To Create Voluntary National Standards For Labeling GMOs
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Food scraps are seen in a compost bin at a San Francisco restaurant. A new report ranks centralized composting as a top strategy for keeping food waste out of landfills, where it emits methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Chew On This: Slicing Meat Helped Shape Modern Humans
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Less-than-perfect fruit and vegetables are sold at a discount under the new Produce with Personality program being piloted at five Giant Eagle stores in Pittsburgh. Courtesy of Giant Eagle hide caption

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A second big study affirms new thinking: Exposing high-risk kids to peanuts beginning in infancy greatly reduces the chance of developing a peanut allergy. And this peanut tolerance holds up as kids get older. iStockphoto hide caption

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Peanut Mush In Infancy Cuts Allergy Risk. New Study Adds To Evidence
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