Allison Aubrey - 2015 i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

[+] read more[-] less

But first, birth control? John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images

These fiber-rich foods altogether offer about 28.5 grams, or a woman's daily recommended intake. Clockwise from top left: one pear, 6 grams of fiber; medium artichoke, 7 grams; 1 ounce of popcorn, 3.5 grams; 1 medium sweet potato, 4 grams; 1 cup edamame, 8 grams. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Morgan McCloy/NPR

Clockwise from top left: French copper pate mold circa 1870, potato steamer c. 1950, poacher for turbot fish c. 1960, Earthenware tripiere pot c. 1920, terracotta toupin for simmering stews and soups from c. 1940. Courtesy of The Culinary Institute of America hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of The Culinary Institute of America

Dole has voluntarily withdrawn from the market all of its Dole-branded and private label packaged salads processed at a Springfield, Ohio plant because the plant has been linked to a Listeria outbreak. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton walks past the peppers at the El Rey grocery store in Milwaukee, Wis., during a campaign stop in 2008. Clinton tells NPR that she eats a fresh hot pepper a day to stay healthy on the campaign trail. She may be on to something. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

Students at Doherty Middle School in Andover, Mass., choose items from the salad bar in the school cafeteria, June 2012. Among other things, a Senate compromise on school nutrition standards calls for the USDA and the CDC to establish new guidance that would encourage the use of salad bars. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty hide caption

toggle caption Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty

Eat This, Not That: The U.S. government's latest Dietary Guidelines call on Americans to eat more vegetables and fruits, more seafood and whole grains, and to cool it on foods high in sugar, refined grains, sodium and saturated fats. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Morgan McCloy/NPR

Seeing double after toasting? Just wait for the hangover that's coming, thanks in part to those bubbles in sparkling wine. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Chris Nickels for NPR

Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

Drinking with co-workers can be festive — and fraught. In an informal survey of Salt readers, 25 percent of you told us you'd gotten tipsy enough to regret it at an office party, and 80 percent said you'd seen a co-worker overdo it, with embarrassing results. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor