Allison Aubrey - 2015 i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey


Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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Longer lines in the cafeteria and shorter lunch periods mean many public school students get just 15 minutes to eat. Yet researchers say when kids get less than 20 minutes for lunch, they eat less of everything on their tray. iStockphoto hide caption

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The government's first ever national target to reduce food waste will encourage farmers to donate more of their imperfect produce to the hungry. iStockphoto hide caption

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A school lunch tray featuring whole wheat tortillas at the School Nutrition Association conference in July 2014. The association is asking Congress to relax the federal school nutrition standards in hopes of attracting more kids back to the school lunch line. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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People who don't get enough sleep show higher levels of inflammation, say scientists who study colds. Smoking, chronic stress and lack of exercise can make you more susceptible to the viruses, too. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis hide caption

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Eat fish or take a fish oil supplement? Research suggests eating fish regularly over a lifetime is good for the brain. But when it comes to staving off cognitive decline in seniors, fish oil supplements just don't cut it, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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The McDonald's inside the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, in 2004. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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