Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

An appeals court hears arguments Wednesday on the future of Philly's landmark tax on sweetened drinks. The money is funding preschool for low-income kids, but the soda industry says it's losing jobs. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Judges Take Up Big Soda's Suit To Abolish Philadelphia's Sugar Tax

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Fate Of Philadelphia's Soda Tax In Limbo As It Faces Legal Challenge

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There's overwhelming consensus that breast-feeding is the optimal way to feed an infant. But the topic of how breast-feeding may influence cognitive ability is controversial. Guerilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

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A girl in a park in Managua, Nicaragua. The country topped the list for gains in happiness. Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Global Ranking Of Happiness Has Happy News For Norway And Nicaragua

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Over three years, a campaign urged Howard County, Md., residents to pare back on sugary drinks — through ads, social media, health counseling and changes to what vending machines sold. And it worked. Adrian Burke/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating too much bacon, or too few whole grains, nuts and seeds, can influence your risk of death from heart disease. Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are linked to diet. Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images

An increasing number of overweight Americans have lost the motivation to diet. enisaksoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Dieting Passe? Study Finds Fewer Overweight People Try To Lose Weight

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New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some breast cancer survivors, soy consumption was found to be tied to longer life. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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For Breast Cancer Survivors, Eating Soy Tied To A Longevity Boost

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New Study Reveals Benefits Of Soy For Breast Cancer Survivors

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A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

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The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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