Allison Aubrey - 2015 i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey


Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

In 2009, Aubrey was awarded both the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for PBS' NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor's of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master's of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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That black triangle icon is a sodium warning label next to a dish on the menu at an Applebee's in New York City. Starting Tuesday, the city's Health Department is requiring chain restaurants with 15 or more locations to display the salt shaker icon next to menu items containing 2,300 mg or more of sodium — the recommended daily limit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peponapis pruinosa is a species of bee in the tribe Eucerini, the long-horned bees. This bee relies on wild and cultivated squashes, pumpkins, gourds and related plants. Wikimedia/USDA hide caption

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If you cook meat too long, at too high a temperature, the chemical reaction that creates tasty flavor and aroma compounds keeps going, creating other compounds. Some of those compounds can be carcinogenic when we consume them in high-enough concentrations. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Four pregnant women sit in lotus position. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Granola cereals on a shelf in Glenview, Ill. "If the FDA were to create a more strict, more comprehensive definition, it would give manufacturers a lot more guidance on whether or not they could use the term 'natural' on their food products," says lawyer Ivan Wasserman. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Microbiologist Mi Kang works to identify a strain of E. coli from a specimen in a lab at the Washington State Department of Health on Tuesday in Shoreline, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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