Allison Aubrey Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Allison Aubrey - 2015
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Allison Aubrey

Correspondent

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News, where her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to the PBS NewsHour.

Aubrey is a 2016 winner of a James Beard Award in the category of "Best TV Segment" for a PBS/NPR collaboration. The series of stories included an investigation of the link between pesticides and the decline of bees and other pollinators, and a two-part series on food waste. Along with her colleagues on The Salt, Aubrey is winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. She was also a nominee for a James Beard Award in 2013 for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. In 2009, Aubrey was awarded the American Society for Nutrition's Media Award for her reporting on food and nutrition. She was honored with the 2006 National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism in radio and earned a 2005 Medical Evidence Fellowship by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Knight Foundation. She was also a 2009 Kaiser Media Fellow in focusing on health.

Joining NPR in 1998 as a general assignment reporter, Aubrey spent five years covering environmental policy, as well as contributing to coverage of Washington, D.C., for NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Aubrey was a reporter for the PBS NewsHour. She has worked in a variety of positions throughout the television industry.

Aubrey received her bachelor of arts degree from Denison University in Granville, OH, and a master of arts degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Confusion over "sell by" and "use by" dates is one big reason why billions of tons of food are tossed each year. A new global initiative of food giants, including Amazon, Walmart and Nestle, aims to tackle that. mrtom-uk//iStockphoto hide caption

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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Researchers set out to answer this question: Is there a safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy? Turns out, that's a hard question to answer. The advice remains: Don't risk it. Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images

Is One Drink OK For Pregnant Women? Around The Globe, The Answer Is No

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The challenge comes at a time when many Americans are cutting back on sugar due to obesity and diabetes risks. Courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company hide caption

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Courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company

Coca-Cola Offers A Sweet Quest: A Million Bucks To Replace Sugar

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Mowing the lawn can be good exercise, and is fun for some people. But others who find themselves squeezed for time might find the luxury of paying someone else to do it to be of much more value than buying more stuff. Kristen Solecki for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Solecki for NPR

Need A Happiness Boost? Spend Your Money To Buy Time, Not More Stuff

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Bike patrol volunteers give directions to visitors at Acadia National Park. The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking. Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works hide caption

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Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works

With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

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Your diet can influence your appearance. You knew that. But did you know that what you eat can also affect your body odor and your attractiveness to the opposite sex? Lilli Carré for NPR hide caption

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Lilli Carré for NPR

Men, Listen Up: Women Like The Smell Of Guys Who Eat A Certain Diet

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Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in the middle of the Potomac River. In contrast to hiking, forest bathing is less directed, melding mindfulness and nature immersion to improve health. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood

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New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as effective as physical therapy in relieving pain. The yoga protocol includes gentle poses and avoids more difficult ones. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These Poses

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Analysts say that the experience of shopping at Whole Foods might change in the near future now that the retailer is being bought by Amazon. Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Twenty percent of baby food samples were found to contain lead, according to a report from the Environmental Defense Fund. The report did not name brand names. Wiktory/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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