Karen Grigsby Bates Karen Grigsby Bates is an NPR correspondent.

What do you see in this image? An "uprising" or a "riot"? David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Is It An 'Uprising' Or A 'Riot'? Depends On Who's Watching

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Ms. Payne interviewing a soldier from Chesapeake, Va., in Vietnam in 1967. Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins hide caption

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Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins

From Selma To Eisenhower, Trailblazing Black Reporter Was Always Probing

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Rev. Willie Barrow, a 'superdelegate,' attending the opening night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention. The long-time activist, who was a mentor to President Obama, died on Thursday. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor/Getty hide caption

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor/Getty

Anna Julia Cooper was the fourth African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a doctoral degree. Scurlock Studios/Smithsonian hide caption

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Scurlock Studios/Smithsonian

A Child Of Slavery Who Taught A Generation

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Claude Sitton, then-editor of the News & Observer, works in his office at the newspaper in Raleigh, N.C., in 1990. Sitton, who was a leader among reporters covering the civil rights movement in the South in the 1950s and '60s and later won a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary, died Tuesday, March 10, 2015. He was 89. Harry Lynch/The News & Observer via AP hide caption

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Harry Lynch/The News & Observer via AP

Rabbi Max Nussbaum (left) and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Los Angeles. Temple Israel of Hollywood hide caption

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Temple Israel of Hollywood

In Hollywood, MLK Delivered A Lesser-Known Speech That Resonates Today

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First-time author Cynthia Bond Courtesy of Cynthiabond.com hide caption

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Courtesy of Cynthiabond.com

Struggling Writer's Debut Novel Gets Coveted Oprah Winfrey Nod

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According to a new study from African-American Policy Forum, black girls and teens are disproportionately impacted by zero-tolerance policies in schools. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and his wife, Chirlane McCray, attend the funeral of New York Police Officer Wenjian Liu in New York City on Jan. 4. McCray was criticized for her choice in clothing. Dennis Van Tine/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Dennis Van Tine/UPI/Landov

Common plays James Bevel, Tessa Thompson plays Diane Nash, Lorraine Toussaint plays Amelia Boynton and Andre Holland plays Andrew Young in Ava DuVernay's Selma. Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures

For Hollywood, 'Selma' Is A New Kind Of Civil Rights Story

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