First Lady Michelle Obama wears her signature cardigan while dancing with performers from the television show So You Can Dance during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on April 6, 2015. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mrs. Obama Saves The Cardigan: 'The Obama Effect' In Fashion
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Don Cheadle plays Miles Davis in the movie Miles Ahead. Cheadle's portrayal is being hailed as capturing the "badass" swagger that made Davis a hero to generations of black men. Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Don Cheadle's Miles Davis: The Latest 'Badass' Black Man On Screen
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Through The Decades: Examining The Black Male Film Hero
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Black Entertainers Encourage Younger Artists To Speak Out For Causes
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Muhammad Ali, world heavyweight boxing champion, stands with Malcolm X (left) outside the Trans-Lux Newsreel Theater in New York in 1964. AP hide caption

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Muhammad Ali And Malcolm X: A Broken Friendship, An Enduring Legacy
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NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell holds a press conference on October 8, 2014 in New York City. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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A Year On, Did NFL Anti-Domestic Violence Efforts Work?
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Morris Robinson in the Los Angeles Opera's 2009 production of The Magic Flute. Los Angeles Opera hide caption

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From Football To Opera: Singer Morris Robinson Takes Center Stage
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On his new album The Reverend Shawn Amos Loves You, musician Shawn Amos combines old-school style with new tools. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shawn Amos' Long Road To Old-School Blues
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For Some African-Americans, Gun Ownership Underscores Segregated Past
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Absorbing Mystery Novel Offers A Glimpse Into Mormon Utah
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Kenya Barris, the creator and writer of Black-ish, in his office on the ABC lot in Burbank, Calif., in December. Black-ish is now in its second season, airing on ABC. Megan Miller for NPR hide caption

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Kenya Barris Creates An 'Absolutely Black' Family for Prime Time
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How 'Black-ish' Writers Use Universal Storylines To Approach Race
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Sweet potato pie has long been a cultural touchstone in the black community. But you don't need Patti's product to try a slice — links to good recipes below. Daniel Zemans/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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