Mont Joli Hotel looks out over Cap-Haitian in northern Haiti. The owner says he's usually fully booked and plans to double the hotel's capacity. Haiti is trying to expand its tourism infrastructure and tap in to the multibillion-dollar Caribbean travel market. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Jacqueline Syra has been living in the La Piste camp for three years. She says she has no idea when she will be able to leave. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Chiara Andolina, a malaria researcher in Thailand, feeds her mosquito colony by letting the insects bite her right arm. These mosquitoes are picky and will dine only on live human blood. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. Army distributed a monthly pinup calendar to GIs, which encouraged them to protect themselves from malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Cartoon by Frank Mack for the U.S. Army./Courtesy of the Images from the History of Medicine. hide caption

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In rural areas of Myanmar, villagers can buy inexpensive packets of drugs, called Ya Chut, when they have malaria. But these local remedies often don't contain adequate amounts of malaria medicines. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Dr. Aun Pyae Phyo examines a baby at the Whampa malaria clinic on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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A boy works at an illegal gold mine in northern Nigeria. Lead from these mines has sickened thousands of children in the region. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A child is inoculated with the polio vaccine at a traffic checkpoint just outside Pakistan's capital, Islamabad. Roadside vaccinations help health workers reach children in mobile populations. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Myat Thu, who owns the Aiya restaurant, takes a break at the bar with his chef Ney Minn. They both grew up in the Burmese capital, Rangoon. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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This 5-year-old boy was carried to a Thai malaria clinic by his mother from deep inside Myanmar. If the mother had waited even a day longer, doctors say, the child probably would have died. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Daw Khin Twon, an undocumented immigrant from Burma, rests at home after receiving malaria treatment at the Mae Tao Clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Sahya Idriss, a service provider at the health clinic in Minjibir, carries a vial of the polio vaccine. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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During the peak of the polio epidemic in the U.S., some hospital wards even had large, room-like iron lungs where multiple children lived. Courtesy of Boston Children's Hospital Archive hide caption

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Women and their children wait for medication and instructions on how to use it at the clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. Treating children with high levels of lead is a painstaking process that works only if their environment at home is free from lead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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