More Hondurans Leaving Their Country To Find Work

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In Mexico, An Eritrean Man Sets His Sights On U.S.

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Olive Ridley turtles come ashore to lay their eggs on La Escobilla beach in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most important nesting grounds in the world for the creatures. Before the Mexican government instituted a ban on their slaughter, Olive Ridley turtles were harvested nearly to extinction. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Endangered Sea Turtles Return To Mexico's Beaches

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Mexico's President Seizes State-Run Electric Co.

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Supporters of deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya protest Saturday in the El Pedregal neighborhood of Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital. Jose Cabezas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Vs. Poor At Root Of Honduran Political Crisis

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Mexico's 'La Familia' Cartel Mixes Spiritualism, Crime

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Yolanda Chavarria, 80, stands in front of police officers during a demonstration in support of Honduras' ousted president, Manuel Zelaya, in Tegucigalpa on Monday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Honduras Cracks Down On Zelaya Supporters

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Honduras Restricts Liberties To Prevent Rebellion

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Hondurans Stage Dueling Presidential Protests

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Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya (center) raises his fist surrounded by supporters, at the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa on Wednesday. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Deposed Honduran President Holed Up In Embassy

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Ousted President Returns To Honduras

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Supporters of ousted and deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya march during Independence Day in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Tuesday. Zelaya has vowed to return to the country and reclaim his office. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leadership Standoff Leaves Honduras In Limbo

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Bloodstained footsteps are seen at the entrance of a drug treatment center after a deadly shooting last week in Juarez, Mexico. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rehab Clinics Targeted In Mexico's Drug War

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Police officials stand guard in front of the El Aliviane drug rehabilitation center in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday. Gunmen broke into the drug rehabilitation center Wednesday night, lined people against a wall and shot 17 dead in a particularly bloody day in Mexico's relentless drug war. AP hide caption

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Mexico's 'Murder Capital' Lives Up To Reputation

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August Proves Deadly For Mexico's War On Drugs

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