"Los Mata Zetas," or the "Zeta Killers," described themselves in a recent video as a paramilitary group that will go after members of the Zeta drug cartel. The Mexican government, however, has described it as a rival drug cartel that is just seeking to eliminate competition from the Zetas.

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Drug Violence Swamps A Once Peaceful Mexican City
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Mexico has launched a publicity blitz to attract more tourists. The vast majority of tourists travel to just one of a half-dozen destinations in Mexico — including Cancun, shown here last year — far from the drug violence.

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In Mexico, Tourism Survives Bloody Drug War
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In Acapulco, Mexico, teachers are out on strike at more than a hundred schools because of spiraling violence related to the country's drug war. Here, a child looks at a sign announcing the closure of a school in Acapulco, Sept. 1. Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Education Is Latest Casualty In Mexico's Drug War
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Caricatures of the ousted Gadhafi have sprung up all over Tripoli. This image of Gadhafi in chains is on a wall in the capital's Fashlum neighborhood. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Freedoms Flourish On Walls Across Tripoli
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Musicians and other Libyans who once dared not express themselves are finding a new outlet on the country's newly freed radio stations. Shown here, a recent day at the studios of Radio Libya — once a state-run station — in Tripoli. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Arab Spring Blooms On Libyan Radio
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Large mortar shells sit unguarded, and boxes that once held anti-aircraft missiles and other heavy weapons are strewn about arms depots around Tripoli. Rebels say they've taken some ammunition, but U.S. officials and others express fears the weapons could fall into the wrong hands. Ben Hubbard/AP hide caption

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U.S. Fears Terrorists Could Acquire Looted Weapons
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Tripoli Bounces Back After Gadhafi Era Ends
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Libyan Rebels Block Gadhafi Stronghold Bani Walid
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Libyan Rebels Threaten To Invade Bani Walid
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Rebels Tighten Hold On Gadhafi Stronghold
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Matthew VanDyke walks toward his former cell as he takes journalists on a tour of the Abu Salim prison in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, on Tuesday. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Americans Emerge After Months In Gadhafi's Prisons
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Libyan Rebels Ask Police To Return To Tripoli
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Libyan Rebels Wary Of Sub-Saharan Africans
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