Soldiers patrol on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, just across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rodrigo Abd/AP

Roberto Silva, 31, holds his 3-year-old son, Adil Noe Silva, at the CURE Orthopedic Pediatric Hospital in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Adil has spina bifida, and the doctors straightened his legs so that hopefully he will be able to walk with braces on his legs. The nonprofit hospital treats children with bone deformities such as clubfeet, dislocated hips and fused fingers. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Children as young as 7 are among the scavengers at the dump on the outskirts of Honduras' second-largest city, San Pedro Sula. Living conditions in Honduras, already one of the poorest countries in the hemisphere, have worsened since a coup in June removed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

A migrant from Guatemala who did not want to be identified walks along the railroad tracks toward a northern-bound freight train in Guadalajara, Mexico, last month. Carlos Jasso/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carlos Jasso/AP

Covering more than 750 acres, the sprawling Central de Abasto in Mexico City is billed as Latin America's largest market. Shoppers and vendors here are feeling the effects of the country's economic downturn. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Olive Ridley turtles come ashore to lay their eggs on La Escobilla beach in Oaxaca, Mexico, one of the most important nesting grounds in the world for the creatures. Before the Mexican government instituted a ban on their slaughter, Olive Ridley turtles were harvested nearly to extinction. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR