A boy stands in the ruins of the leveled a neighborhood in Tacloban. Food and water supplies were almost nonexsistent in the days immediately after the storm. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A polio worker vaccinates a child in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan, in October. Arshad Arbab/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Children get tested for malaria at a clinic near the Myanmar border in Sai Yoke, Thailand. Drug-resistant strains of the parasite have appeared in the region over the past few years. Surkree Sukplang/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Former South African President Nelson Mandela, one of the world's most respected statesmen, died Thursday at 95. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Filipino men stand in line to fill containers with gas in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday. The area experienced widespread gas shortages in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A Filipino woman prays at morning Mass at Santo Nino church, which was damaged by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets. Frederic Courbet for NPR hide caption

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Parallels

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

American entrepreneurs in Kenya are attempting to fundamentally transform education for some of the poorest kids in the world — while making a profit.

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