In Quake-Struck Japan, Businesses Try To Rebuild

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On March 27, members of the environmental group Greenpeace monitor contamination levels at Iitate village near the Fukushima nuclear complex, just outside the 12-mile mandatory evacuation zone. The area is not under any order to evacuate, yet nearly half of Iitate's 6,000 residents have fled town. Christian Aslund/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Outside Japan's Evacuation Zone, Villages In Limbo

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Japanese workers load the body of a elderly man into the back of a cargo truck after finding him dead in the wreckage of Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture, on March 23. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Japanese Workers Unite To Rebuild Post-Tragedy

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Survivors push bicycles along streets Thursday in the devastated city of Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture, in northeastern Japan. The powerful earthquake and resulting tsunami devastated the area about two weeks ago. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Japanese School A Blessing And A Curse For Students

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A woman carries fuel as lines of people wait with hopes of filling containers in Fukushima city on March 20. Wally Santana/AP hide caption

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In Fukushima City Shelter, Evacuees Imagine Future

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Life Gets A Little Easier For Residents Of Sendai

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U.S. Air Force and Japanese Defense Force workers unload relief supplies at Misawa Air Base in Japan on Saturday. Both the Air Force and the Navy are using the base to move crucial materials to the affected areas of the tsunami and earthquake zones on the northeast coast of Japan's main island. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Japan Relief Efforts Centered At U.S. Military Bases

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A man looks over at the empty pumps of a filling station near the town of Noda. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In Northeastern Japan, A 'Very Unsettling Time'

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Gadhafi Charges Darnah Is Controlled By Al-Qaida

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Frustrations With Libyan Leader Uncorked In Tobruk

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A rebel militiaman stands guard at a Libyan oil refinery Sunday in Al Brega, Libya. The opposition leadership has stressed that oil facilities in rebel-held territory are safe, despite the conflict roiling the country. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Libyan Rebels: Oil Will Keep Flowing, 'No Problem'

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Evidence Of Gadhafi's Downfall On Display In East

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Responding To Protests, Gadhafi Makes Bloody Appeal

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Arab League Reprimands Libya's Gadhafi

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Opposition Controls Parts Of Libya; Tripoli In Turmoil

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