Mexican soldiers have taken control of the police department in downtown Matamoros, in the border state of Tamaulipas. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR
Mexico Replaces Police With Soldiers In Border Area
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137393901/137401137" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mexico Captures Reputed Leader Of La Familia Cartel
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137336383/137328061" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saul Alvarez of Mexico (right) lands a punch before knocking out opponent Carlos Baldomir of Argentina at a fight in 2010. In March, Alvarez became the WBC super welterweight champion and will defend the title Saturday in his hometown of Guadalajara. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images
Mexico's Red Hot Boxing Star Ready To Defend Title
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137248008/137257591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Julian Leyzaola, police chief of Juarez, says bringing crime down and cleaning up the police force should be much easier than it was in Tijuana, where he spent three years as the top cop. Juan Carlos Llorca/AP hide caption

toggle caption Juan Carlos Llorca/AP
Juarez Police Chief: Drug Cartels Aren't Invincible
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137104614/137135020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Report Blasts War On Drugs
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136972470/136972444" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Barrio La Victoria Ciudad Delgado in San Salvador, El Salvador, is controlled by the Mara Salvatrucha gang. A gang leader says he sees the group as a social organization — one that provides services, like water, and protects "civilians." Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR
El Salvador Fears Ties Between Cartels, Street Gangs
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136829224/136845524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Salvadoran police squad "The Hawks" search suspected gang members in San Salvador. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR
El Salvador Grapples With Upswing In Drug Traffic
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136727186/136810724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Soldiers walk past part of a message written in blood at the site of a massacre at a ranch in northern Guatemala on May 16. The message is a warning to Otto Salguero — the owner of the ranch, according to local media. Guatemalan authorities blame the killings on the Mexican drug cartel Los Zetas. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption Moises Castillo/AP
Mexican Cartels Spread Violence To Central America
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136690257/136786357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Soumaya Museum in Mexico City was designed by Carlos Slim's son-in-law and houses Slim's collection of more than 65,000 pieces. It is dominated by works from European and Mexican artists. Walter Shintani/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Walter Shintani/LatinContent/Getty Images
World's Richest Man Opens Flashy Museum In Mexico
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136051387/136304603" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
After Son's Death, Poet Fights Mexican Drug Violence
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136063064/136063045" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Soldiers escort 14-year-old Edgar Jimenez Lugo, also known as "El Ponchis," after his arrest in the city of Cuernavaca, Mexico, last December. Jimenez is suspected of working as a killer for a drug cartel and confessed to participating in four beheadings. Antonio Sierra/AP hide caption

toggle caption Antonio Sierra/AP
War Turning Mexican Kids Into Targets, Killers
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135813656/135891257" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gilberto Morales Pedraza, 20, as Jesus Christ, leads the disciples through the streets of the Mexico City neighborhood of Ixtapalapa. This is the 168th year that residents of this neighborhood have re-enacted Christ's final days in Jerusalem, his crucifixion and his resurrection. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR
Mexicans Hope For Miracles In Staging Of The Passion
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135575926/135578872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Juana Sanchez, 57, waits for news about her 38-year-old son, who has been missing since May 2010, in front of the morgue in Matamoros, in the northern Mexican state of Tamaulipas, on Friday. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

toggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP
Mexicans Look For Missing After Mass Graves Found
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135386583/135388928" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Then-candidate Michel Martelly casts his ballot at a polling station during a presidential runoff in Port-au-Prince, on March 20. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ramon Espinosa/AP
Novice Politician, Pop Star Haiti's President-To-Be
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135152007/135153417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A farmer stands in front of a mountain of spinach, disposed after gathering in Fukushima, Japan, on March 26. The government has banned the sale of milk, spinach and other leafy vegetables from Fukushima and neighboring prefectures. Jun Yasukawa/Yomiuri Shimbun/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jun Yasukawa/Yomiuri Shimbun/AP
For Fukushima's Farmers, Growing Uncertainty
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135023027/135033592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript