In heavily polluted Mexico City, crime writer Paco Ignacio Taibo II describes his exhausted detective Hector Belascoaran Shayne as looking out at his hometown and seeing "a city that was trying to hide itself in the smog." Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sleuth Keeps His Good Eye On Mexico City's Crime

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Tourists visit the San Felipe neighborhood in Panama City in December 2011. Panama is experiencing record economic growth, but many fear the benefits aren't trickling down to the poor. Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Panama Booms While Poor Watch From Afar

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The Panama Canal is undergoing its biggest overhaul since it was opened nearly a century ago. A third channel is being built, which will allow more and larger ships to pass through. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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An Upgrade, And Bigger Ships, For The Panama Canal

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Pope Benedict XVI listens to a speech during his welcome ceremony in Mexico. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Pope Encounters A 'Wounded, Depressed' Mexico

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Pope Benedict XVI is expected to speak out against drug violence during his visit to Mexico, which begins Friday. Here, an actor is shown in front of a poster announcing the pope's visit Wednesday in the Mexican city of Leon, Guanajuato state. Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pope Expected To Address Drug Violence In Mexico

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In Honduras, female relatives of inmates killed during a fire at a prison argue with soldiers as they try to enter the morgue in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, on Feb. 20. The fire at Comayagua prison on Feb. 14 killed more than 300 inmates. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Violence Exposes Crisis In Latin American Prisons

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A relative of an inmate observes Mexican police behind the security fence after a riot inside Apodaca prison near Monterrey. At least 44 inmates were killed during Sunday's riot, and about 30 alleged members of the drug cartel Los Zetas were rushed out of the prison. Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prison Break Epitomizes Mexican Drug War Woes

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Josefina Vazquez Mota celebrates her selection as the presidential candidate of the National Action Party in Mexico City on Feb. 5. She's the first woman to run for president in Mexico on a major party ticket. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Female Candidate Battles Machismo In Mexico

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Mexican police show the drug and weapons seized from Jaime Herrera Herrera, an alleged drug cartel member, in Mexico City on Tuesday. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mexican Cartels Push Meth Beyond U.S. Market

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Haitians suffering from cholera symptoms rest at the treatment center in Mirebalais, a dusty town north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, last June. The cholera epidemic in Haiti began in Mirebalais, believed to be the result of overflowing bathrooms from a nearby U.N. compound. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Can Vaccines Break Cholera's Deadly Hold On Haiti?

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A vulture picks at a dead steer. Ranchers say many cattle have died because of the drought that has ravaged much of Mexico. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Drought Ravages Farms Across Wide Swath Of Mexico

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Rodrigo y Gabriela's new album, Area 52, was recorded in Havana with a full Cuban orchestra. Tina Korhonen hide caption

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Rodrigo Y Gabriela's Havana Nights

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A worker pushes a wheelbarrow past the new National Teaching Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti, on Jan. 10. When it opens this summer, the 320-bed facility will be Haiti's largest hospital and provide services and a level of care well beyond what's currently available. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

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State-Of-The-Art Hospital Offers Hope For Haiti

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Pastor Junior Antoine on stage at Shalom Tabernacle of Glory evangelical church, in front of a congregation that grew rapidly after the earthquake two years ago. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Church Broadcasts Hope; Haitians Flock Post-Quake

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Relatives of those who died in the 2010 earthquake attend a memorial service at the mass grave site in Titanyen, on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Thursday. Haitians are marking the second anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake with church services throughout the country on what is a national holiday of remembrance. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Haiti: Reflections On Overcoming 2 Years Of Disaster

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