Mexico Captures Reputed Drug Lord 'The Barbie'

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A migrant from Honduras waits for a train during his journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border on the outskirts of Mexico City. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Migrants Are Prey In Mexico's Deadly Violence

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A group of people kidnapped by alleged drug traffickers as they were rescued by members of the Mexican army in Sabinas Hidalgo, north of Monterrey, on April 27. Sixteen people, including a woman and a 2-year-old girl, were rescued during the operation. Dario Leon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mexico's Drug War Spawns Wave Of Kidnappings

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Drug Cartel Suspected In 72 Migrants Deaths

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Bodies Of 72 Massacred Migrants Found In Mexico

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Police officers patrol a street in Torreon, in the northern Mexican state of Coahuila, on July 19 after gunmen interrupted a party there, killing 17 people and injuring at least 18. Ramon Sotomayor/AP hide caption

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As The Drug War Rages On, Will Mexico Surrender?

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Acapulco, Mexico's celebrated coastal resort, was once a destination for Hollywood stars, but now struggles to attract foreign tourists frightened by drug-related violence. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Mexico's Vacation Paradise Marred By Drug Carnage

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A Toyota Sienna minivan has been bulletproofed in a Mexico City shop that retrofits vehicles with armor. The glass in the door window is considerably thicker than in regular car windows. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Amid Mexico's Drug War, A Rush For Bulletproof Cars

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A military police officer patrols at the scene of a murder in Juarez, Mexico, in March. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Mexico's Drug Cartels Use Force To Silence Media

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A police officer runs following a car bomb attack on police patrol trucks July 15 in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The Juarez cartel claimed responsibility for the blast, which killed three people and marked an unprecedented escalation in Mexico's drug war. AP hide caption

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As Drug War Turns Into Quagmire, Fear Rules Mexico

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Mexican navy marines patrol a crime scene near Monterrey, Mexico, after unidentified gunmen killed one person while trying to assassinate the local police chief, March 21, 2010. Monterrey's economy is rebounding, but rampant drug violence is keeping investors away. AP hide caption

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Drug War Hurts Mexican Business Center's Revival

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Cuba Marks Anniversary Of Revolution

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Car Bomb Escalates Mexico Drug War

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