Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR
Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world. He's covered mass circumcision drives in Kenya, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as the inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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The Terrain Hotel compound was ransacked by South Sudanese troops, who went on to attack foreign aid workers holed up there. Adriane Ohanesian/AP hide caption

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Gang Rape Of Aid Workers In South Sudan Is A Turning Point

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Haitians protest in front of a U.N. office on Oct. 15, 2015, demanding reparations for families of people who suffered or died from cholera. The outbreak started in 2010, claiming some 9,000 lives. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Debate Continues Over U.N. Role In Bringing Cholera To Haiti

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Ado Ibrahim carries his son Aminu through a village in northern Nigeria. Aminu was paralyzed by polio in 2012. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Polio Rears Its Head Again In Africa

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A city worker in San Juan, Puerto Rico, cleans up a vacant lot where mosquitoes could be breeding. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico's Efforts To Stop Zika Are Hampered By Mistrust

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This is what's called a "specimen lot" — a large mason jar holding smaller vials of parasitic worms gathered by a researcher in 1927. The Smithsonian collection has more than 120,000 specimen lots. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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#NPRWormWeek: Worms Are Bottled Up In The Smithsonian's Crawl Space

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Puerto Rican OB-GYNs Offer Free Birth Control To Fight Zika

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A health department pickup truck sprays insecticide against mosquitoes in a San Juan, Puerto Rico, neighborhood in January. Alvin Baez/Reuters hide caption

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Zika Cases Surge In Puerto Rico As Mosquitoes Flourish

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Every day, hundreds of patients wait to be seen at the Munhava health center in Mozambique's port city of Beira. Morgana Wingard hide caption

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The Sole Doctor In The Hospital Shoulders The Burden Of HIV

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Catherine Msimango, 18, takes a nightly pill to protect her against HIV. "It's all about my safety," says the South African high schooler. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Why Healthy Teens Are Taking A Daily Anti-AIDS Pill

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The alleyway known as the Beira "corridor" is part of the city's informal prostitution zone, where sex workers wait to meet clients. Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fighting HIV In Two High-Risk Groups: Sex Workers And Truck Drivers

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Cleopas Kapembwa Chisanga of Zambia, who is HIV positive, is the subject of a new video and will be broadcasting from this week's International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. Sydelle Willow Smith/International Aids Society hide caption

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International AIDS Conference Returns To Durban, South Africa.

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David Gilkey is seen in 2013 at NPR's Afghanistan bureau as he started a month in the country. David wore silver bracelets on his wrist as a kind of good luck charm. He said every time he had a near-death experience, he let one go. He threw one into the Euphrates River after the second battle of Fallujah. Another went into the Helmand River after he covered the arrival of U.S. Marines in 2009. Graham Paul Smith/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey Was 'An Incredibly Thoughtful' Photographer In The Midst Of Plight

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Medical worker Abaare Hussein extracts a Guinea worm from a child's leg in Savelugu Village in northern Ghana in 2007. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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The Last Days Of Guinea Worm

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'High Highs And Deep Lows': 5 Days With Doctors Without Borders In South Sudan

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