Doby Photography/NPR
Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world. He's covered mass circumcision drives in Kenya, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as the inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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Story Archive

Countries that received the most remittance dollars from the U.S. in 2015 Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

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A Proposed New Tax, Mainly On Latinos, To Pay For Trump's Border Wall

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Supporters of Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus rally for his candidacy for World Health Organization director-general in Geneva on May 23. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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World Health Organization Elects First Director-General From Africa

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Morning News Brief: Comey Testifies, Spinning The Budget Deal, Hospital Attacks

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On August 8, 2016, a suicide bomber killed 74 people and wounded 112 others at a government-run hospital in Quetta, Pakistan. Arshad Butt/AP hide caption

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Report: Health Workers Attacked In 23 Countries Last Year

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A chile-rubbed pork taco is topped with french fries in the Merced market in Mexico City. The taco costs 10 pesos — less than 50 cents. Cheap, high-calorie food is contributing to Mexico's obesity problem. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Pork Tacos Topped With Fries: Fuel For Mexico's Diabetes Epidemic

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Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

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A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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Photo illustration by David Malan/Getty Images

What If You Held An African Summit And No Africans Could Come?

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