Jason Beaubien 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world. He's covered mass circumcision drives in Kenya, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as the inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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David Gilkey is seen in 2013 at NPR's Afghanistan bureau as he started a month in the country. David wore silver bracelets on his wrist as a kind of good luck charm. He said every time he had a near-death experience, he let one go. He threw one into the Euphrates River after the second battle of Fallujah. Another went into the Helmand River after he covered the arrival of U.S. Marines in 2009. Graham Paul Smith/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey Was 'An Incredibly Thoughtful' Photographer In The Midst Of Plight

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Medical worker Abaare Hussein extracts a Guinea worm from a child's leg in Savelugu Village in northern Ghana in 2007. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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The Last Days Of Guinea Worm

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'High Highs And Deep Lows': 5 Days With Doctors Without Borders In South Sudan

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Morning at the MSF hospital compound in Bentiu, South Sudan. The two doctors, Jiske Steensma (left) and Navpreet Sahsi, sit in front of the tents that serve as living quarters for the international workers during their three-to-six-month stints. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Embedded Podcast: The 'High Highs' And 'Deep Lows' At A Doctors Without Borders Hospital

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Dr. Forster Amponsah is one of two surgeons at the Koforidua Regional Hospital in Ghana. Trained in Cuba, he came home because he felt his skills were needed in Africa. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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The Improvisational Surgeon: Cardboard Casts, No Power, Patients Galore

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U.N. Report Documents Systemic Rape By Government Troops In South Sudan

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Hundreds of thousands of South Sudanese have fled their homes because of the ongoing civil war. (Above) Kids at a displaced persons camp in Bentiu. Many of the residents came from the part of South Sudan where the shipping container massacre reportedly occurred. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Children stand on top of an earthen dam in the camp in Bentiu. Massive dams, drainage canals and water retention pools were constructed after the camp flooded repeatedly during the rainy season. Residents say the water and mud was so deep in their huts that they had to sleep sitting up in chairs. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Nothing Is Going Right In The World's Newest Nation

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The town of Bentiu, in South Sudan, has been nearly abandoned. On the main road, a boy hides behind a telephone pole. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Living In A Camp By A Ruined City, They're Strangers In Their Own Land

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South Sudan Faces New Obstacles To Implementing Peace Deal

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