Doby Photography/NPR
Jason Beaubien 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jason Beaubien

Global Health and Development Correspondent

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world. He's covered mass circumcision drives in Kenya, abortion in El Salvador, poisonous gold mines in Nigeria, drug-resistant malaria in Myanmar and tuberculosis in Tajikistan. He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. His current beat also examines development issues including why Niger has the highest birth rate in the world, can private schools serve some of the poorest kids on the planet and the links between obesity and economic growth.

Prior to becoming the Global Health and Development Correspondent in 2012, Beaubien spent four years based in Mexico City covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. In that role, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, the 2010 Haitian earthquake, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

For his first multi-part series as the Mexico City correspondent, Beaubien drove the length of the U.S./Mexico border making a point to touch his toes in both oceans. The stories chronicled the economic, social and political changes along the violent frontier.

In 2002, Beaubien joined NPR after volunteering to cover a coup attempt in the Ivory Coast. Over the next four years, Beaubien worked as a foreign correspondent in sub-Saharan Africa, visiting 27 countries on the continent. His reporting ranged from poverty on the world's poorest continent, the HIV in the epicenter of the epidemic, and the all-night a cappella contests in South Africa, to Afro-pop stars in Nigeria and a trial of white mercenaries in Equatorial Guinea.

During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as the inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. Beaubien was one of the first journalists to report on the huge exodus of people out of Sudan's Darfur region into Chad, as villagers fled some of the initial attacks by the Janjawid. He reported extensively on the steady deterioration of Zimbabwe and still has a collection of worthless Zimbabwean currency.

In 2006, Beaubien was awarded a Knight-Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan to study the relationship between the developed and the developing world.

Beaubien grew up in Maine, started his radio career as an intern at NPR Member Station KQED in San Francisco and worked at WBUR in Boston before joining NPR.

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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, pictured during a 2014 visit to Haiti to inaugurate a sanitation campaign. On Thursday, he issued an apology that Haitians have been demanding for six years. Hector Retamal /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-Zika advice applied to a wall in front of a housing project in the Puerta de Tierras section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. This public health message was part of an island-wide effort to stem the spread of Zika. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Bradley Opere, student body president at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, is a trailblazer in a blazer. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Kenyan 'Wonk' Breaks Barriers As Student Body Prez At UNC

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A woman carries a bucket of water on her head on the streets of capital city Bamako during the rainy season in Mali. Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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The Rainy Season Strategy To Stop Malaria

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A child receives the second dose of the vaccine against cholera in Saut d'Eau, Haiti, in a 2014 campaign. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haiti Launches Largest-Ever Cholera Vaccination Campaign

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A young Haitian suffering from cholera symptoms receives medical attention Saturday at Saint Antoine Hospital of Jeremie in southwestern Haiti. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Linked To Haiti Cholera Outbreak, U.N. Considers Paying Millions In Compensation

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The rice fields below the village of Banatte. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Who Can Haitians Trust To Deliver Hurricane Aid?

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Girls stand in front of their destroyed home in the Dumont section of Port Salut, Haiti. They're now living in the thatched shack that's directly behind the rubble of their home. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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How Many Houses Did Hurricane Leave Standing In Port Salut, Haiti?

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Nicholas Buisson stands next to his tattered hammock on the beach in front of his house in Port Salut. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Haitians Weather Hurricane: 'If We're Going To Die, We're Going To Die Here'

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Hurricane Matthew Leaves Death And Destruction In Southern Haiti

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