At a San Jose, Calif. library, a young reader browses a shelf of books featuring a variety of main characters: ducks, hens, white kids, black kids. Libraries help drive demand for children's books with nonwhite characters, but book publishers say there aren't enough libraries to make those books best-sellers. San Jose Library/Flickr hide caption

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As Demographics Shift, Kids' Books Stay Stubbornly White

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He's still a would-be world-conquerer by day, but Gru (left, with minions) has been settling into his role as an adoptive dad by night. His new responsibilities make him a likely recruit for the Anti-Villain League, which asks him to ... well, we shouldn't give too much away. Universal hide caption

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'Me' Too: For Gru, Another Shot At Global Domination

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Sue Glader wrote Nowhere Hair after finding many children's books about cancer that were too depressing or scary. Courtesy Sue Glader hide caption

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How To Introduce Kids To Tough Topics? Art And TV Can Help

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The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden proposed adding a giant, inflatable structure that would balloon out of its top and side. Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Plans For Smithsonian Museum 'Bubble' May Have Burst

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Georges Moustaki with Edith Piaf in New York in 1958. Moustaki wrote the lyrics to "Milord," one of Piaf's biggest hits. Keystone-France/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Moustaki, Who Wrote Songs For Edith Piaf, Dies

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Despite Digital Platforms, TV Still Relies On Word Of Mouth

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Serena (right) and Venus Williams pose with their gold medals during the London 2012 Olympic Games. Stefan Wermuth/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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'Venus And Serena': An Extraordinary Story, Told On Film

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Life Pieces to Masterpieces is an arts program that serves the neighborhood of Ward 7 in Washington, D.C. Boys work with mentors to create works of art. Lizzie Chen /NPR hide caption

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In D.C., Art Program Turns Boys' Lives Into 'Masterpieces'

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E. Paul Torrance, shown here in the mid-'80s, spent most of his career studying and encouraging students' creativity. Courtesy University of Georgia hide caption

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More Than 50 Years Of Putting Kids' Creativity To The Test

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Jionni Anderson is a third grader at Savoy Elementary School. Anderson raises her hand to answer a question in Mr. Scott's keyboard class. Lizzie Chen /NPR hide caption

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Creative Classes: An Artful Approach To Improving Performance

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The singer-songwriter released her debut studio album, Is Your Love Big Enough, this summer. Ravi Dhar/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lianne La Havas: 'The Golden Girl Of British Music'

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Johanna Day as Margie and Andrew Long as Mike in the recent Arena Stage production of David Lindsay-Abaire's Good People. The childhood friends drift apart as their lives take on very different socioeconomic dimensions. Margot Schulman/Arena Stage hide caption

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Familiar Folks Make Up A Play's 'Good People'

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Sergei Filin, artistic director of the Moscow Bolshoi Theatre's Bolshoi Ballet, was nearly blinded by an attacker on Jan. 17. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Moscow, Scandals Shake A Storied Ballet

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Deutsch LA

For Super Bowl Ads, More Social-Media Savvy

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A scene from 99% — The Occupy Wall Street Collaborative Film, a Sundance documentary that raised more than $23,000 on Kickstarter. Ari Ress/Sundance Film Festival hide caption

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For Would-Be Sundancers, Kickstarter Can Fuel Films

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