Cheryl Corley Cheryl Corley is a NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

After 2 Years, Illinois Passes A Budget

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A police officer stands near the site where Officer Miosotis Familia was killed. Familia was shot to death early Wednesday, ambushed inside her command post by an ex-convict, authorities said. He was later killed after pulling a gun on police. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Police Fatalities On The Rise

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Sales Are Slow For Trump Condos In Chicago

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Chicago Could Lose Federal Funds Under Scope Of 'Sanctuary Cities' Order

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For Some Moms, Posting Bail Means They Can Spend Mother's Day With Their Families

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Carla and Jeremy Lang push their twin 18-month-old sons in a stroller while looking at ovens and stoves at a Sears northwest of Chicago. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Its Survival In Doubt, Sears Struggles To Transform Once Again

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News Brief: Trump Executive Order, Pence In Japan, Sears In Trouble

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Chicago Police Department Overhaul To Continue, Mayor Says

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Jerusha Hodge is among the handful of CeaseFire outreach workers who work to curtail violence in three South Side Chicago neighborhoods. Hodge says shootings are down in the areas where CeaseFire has a presence. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Treat Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis, One Program Says

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Scientific Conference Planners Concerned About Immigration Policy

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Southern Poverty Law Center Records Rise In U.S. Hate Groups

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Flags printed with President Trump's face are sold outside one of the entrances to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Inauguration Day on Jan. 20. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Trump Supporters Cheer Quick Starts On Campaign Promises In His First Weeks

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There was a huge jump last year in the number of murders in Chicago. As young people are affected by the gun violence, community leaders look for answers. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

In Bid To Curb Violence, Chicago Gets Some Ideas From Teens Behind Bars

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