Cheryl Corley
Steve Barrett/NPR

Cheryl Corley

Correspondent, National Desk, Chicago

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

In addition, Corley was among the group of NPR reporters covering the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita as they tore through the Gulf Coast. She returned to the area, five years later, and joined the reporting team covering the impact of the BP oil spill. Corley also has served as a fill-in host for NPR shows, including Weekend All Things Considered, Tell Me More, and Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, Corley was the news director at Chicago's public radio station, WBEZ, where she supervised an award-winning team of reporters. She also has been a frequent panelist on television news-affairs programs in Chicago.

Corley has received awards for her work from a number of organizations including the National Association of Black Journalists, the Associated Press, the Public Radio News Directors Association, and the Society of Professional Journalists. She earned the Community Media Workshop's Studs Terkel Award for excellence in reporting on Chicago's diverse communities and a Herman Kogan Award for reporting on immigration issues.

A Chicago native, Corley graduated cum laude from Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, and is now a Bradley University trustee. While in Peoria, Corley worked as a reporter and news director for public radio station WCBU and as a television director for the NBC affiliate, WEEK-TV. She is a past President of the Association for Women Journalists in Chicago.

She is also the co-creator of the Cindy Bandle Young Critics Program. The critics/journalism training program for female high school juniors is a collaboration between AWJ-Chicago and the Goodman Theatre. Corley has also served as a board member of Community Television Network, an organization that trains Chicago youth in video and multi-media production.

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Chicago's North Broadway Street has been undergoing water main upgrades in the past few weeks, with more work scheduled this year. The upgrades are part of the city's 10-year plan to replace 900 miles of water pipes. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Chicago's Upgrades To Aging Water Lines May Disturb Lead Pipes
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Feds: Denying Housing Over Criminal Record May Be Discrimination
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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago
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Chicago Considers 3 Finalists To Lead Ailing Police Department
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A sign at the Westside Diner in Flint, Mich., reassures customers that it serves uncontaminated water pulled from Detroit's drinking supply. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Tests Say The Water Is Safe. But Flint's Restaurants Still Struggle
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Public Universities Struggle Without State Aid Amid Illinois Budget Crisis
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A mural depicting peace in Ferguson was painted on the wall of a vacant building near the city's police department. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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On Road To Recovery, Ferguson Residents Have Different Ideas
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Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner Overlooks Budget Crisis In State Of The State Speech
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7 Months Without A Budget, Ill. Gov. Rauner To Deliver State Address
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Black Lives Matter Protesters Crash U.S. Conference Of Mayors Meeting
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Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel responds to a question during a news conference last month about new police procedures. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Chicago Shooting Drives Calls For Emanuel To Go, So Far Without Result
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Furor Over Police Shootings In Chicago Continues
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Latest Chicago Police Shooting Ramps Up Calls For Mayor To Step Down
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Protesters And City Policing: 2016 Brings Room To Improve Relations
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Chicago Mayor Apologizes For Police Killing Of Black Teenager
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