Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum says Congress is unfairly coercing states to expand Medicaid roles. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Steve Cannon/AP

Members of the Vietnamese community listen in Kenner, La., as independent claims administrator Ken Feinberg and Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu conduct a town hall meeting for residents economically affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gerald Herbert/AP

Aaron Hofer, 27, of Bayou La Batre, Ala., has been largely out of work since the BP oil spill. The Iraq veteran and fourth-generation shrimper says if it wasn't for his children, he probably would have already committed suicide. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Homemaker Lena Hofer, 25, recently went to the community center in Bayou La Batre, Ala., for free food and household goods -- and was reluctantly turned away by volunteers when Feed the Children ran out of supplies. "It's really hard when they send you away after you [ask for food], especially when you need it like I do," she says. "I'm about to cry." Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Republican Tim Scott celebrates his victory in a South Carolina House race at an election night party. Scott is the first African-American Republican elected to Congress from the state since Reconstruction. Alice Keeney/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alice Keeney/AP

Waves breaking on the shore in Orange Beach, Ala., leave behind an oily residue. Mayor Tony Kennon expects BP to restore the town's beaches to sugar white condition. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Darryl and Kristina Pendergrass and their sons, William, 3, and Ian, 20 months. The family gets by on Daryl's $43,000-a-year salary as a biologist with the Alabama Department of Public Health. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Two years ago, college students on the NAACP's "Vote Hard" bus tour encouraged people to vote in Selma, Ala., in the presidential race. African-American voters went to the polls in droves. Now, the Democratic National Committee is trying to do the same for the midterm elections. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mario Tama/Getty Images