Doby Photography/NPR
Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Pam Fessler

Correspondent, National Desk

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.

In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category.

Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations.

Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton and the 1998 mid-term elections. She was NPR's chief election editor in 1996, and coordinated all network coverage of the presidential, congressional, and state elections. Prior to that role, Fessler was the deputy Washington editor and Midwest National Desk editor.

Before coming to NPR in 1993, she was a senior writer at Congressional Quarterly magazine. Fessler worked at CQ for 13 years as both a reporter and editor, covering tax, budget, and other news. She also worked as a budget specialist at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and was a reporter at The Record newspaper in Hackensack, NJ.

Fessler has a Masters of Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a bachelor's degree from Douglass College in New Jersey.

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A man walks by the Farragut Houses, a public housing project in Brooklyn, N.Y. The budget blueprint President Trump released Thursday calls for the cutting of billions of dollars in funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Advocates Say Trump Budget Cuts Will Hurt Country's Most Vulnerable

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A police officer votes at Belmont High School on Feb. 9, 2016, in Belmont, N.H., during the New Hampshire presidential primary. The state's lawmakers are now debating bills that would tighten residency requirements for new voters. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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State Republicans Push For More Restrictive Voting Laws

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As Trump Warns Against Fraud, GOP Votes To Eliminate Election Commission

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Joseph Funn experienced homelessness for almost 20 years, until he moved into an apartment in December. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Obamacare Helped The Homeless, Who Now Worry About Coverage Repeal

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President Trump called for a major investigation into voter fraud on Wednesday. This comes after widespread criticism of his unverified claim that up to 5 million people voted illegally. Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Criticism Of Claims, Trump Seeks Investigation Into Voter Fraud

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Inauguration Day 2017: The View From The White House, Mall

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Women's Marches Across The Country Highlight Numerous Issues

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Adam Eidinger (at right, in hat), a leader of DC Cannabis Coalition, and other volunteers roll marijuana joints they plan to hand out for free on Inauguration Day. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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From Glitter To Free Joints, Trump Protesters Plan To Get Their Message Out

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Senate Banking Committee Grills HUD Nominee Ben Carson In Hearing

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HUD Secretary Julian Castro hopes his likely successor, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, will come to support many of HUD's programs, but worries whether he'll roll back a new fair housing rule. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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HUD's Castro Worries That Housing Rule Could Be Rolled Back

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Charitable Giving Sees Big Bump In 2016

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