Pam Fessler 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Pam Fessler

Correspondent, National Desk

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.

In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category.

Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations.

Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton and the 1998 mid-term elections. She was NPR's chief election editor in 1996, and coordinated all network coverage of the presidential, congressional, and state elections. Prior to that role, Fessler was the deputy Washington editor and Midwest National Desk editor.

Before coming to NPR in 1993, she was a senior writer at Congressional Quarterly magazine. Fessler worked at CQ for 13 years as both a reporter and editor, covering tax, budget, and other news. She also worked as a budget specialist at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and was a reporter at The Record newspaper in Hackensack, NJ.

Fessler has a Masters of Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a bachelor's degree from Douglass College in New Jersey.

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After a long day, Emeka arrives home to the apartment in South Tulsa that he shares with his father. Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR hide caption

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Jordan McClellan gets help making lunch from daughter Kyra Brooks in their apartment in Southeast Washington, D.C. McClellan has been fighting homelessness for most of her adult life, living in family shelters and transitional housing until she was moved into the rapid rehousing program. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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A man walks past the damaged Oxford Tavern on April 30 in Baltimore. Richard Sung Kang's liquor store and bar was hit by looters during a riot over the police-involved death of neighborhood resident Freddie Gray. The doors and windows were broken and cash and inventory stolen, leaving shelves bare. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Ruby Corado, second from right, and Selena Cruz whip their hair around playfully while joking with Lazema Mills, left, and Giselle Gartzog, right, at Casa Ruby, a drop-in and service center for transgender people in Washington, D.C. Through the center, Corado helps people find housing, medical care and get food. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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Ruby Corado runs Casa Ruby, a drop-in and service center for transgender people in Washington, D.C. Through the center, Corado helps people find housing, medical care and get food. Corado also has 22 beds in transitional housing for transgender adults and youth who would otherwise be homeless. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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States with implemented or planned online voter registration. Danny DeBelius hide caption

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Voters in Los Angeles County, Calif., cast their ballots in 2012. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Several states are considering measures restricting how welfare benefits can be used. In Kansas, a bill on the governor's desk will bar recipients from spending their benefits on movies, swimming or casinos, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from ATMs. Brownie Harris/Corbis hide caption

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A big crowd turned out for the March of Dimes walkathon in Gainesville, Fla., in early March. But overall, the March of Dimes' March for Babies raised $3.5 million less in 2014 than it did the year before. Elizabeth Hamilton/Gainesville Sun/Landov hide caption

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After a long day at the Somali American Community Center he founded in Clarkston, Ga., and then at an after-school program, Omar Shekhey drives a taxi to earn extra money. Often he gives his earnings to refugees to help them with expenses. Kevin Liles for NPR hide caption

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