Pam Fessler 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Pam Fessler

Correspondent, National Desk

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.

In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category.

Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations.

Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton and the 1998 mid-term elections. She was NPR's chief election editor in 1996, and coordinated all network coverage of the presidential, congressional, and state elections. Prior to that role, Fessler was the deputy Washington editor and Midwest National Desk editor.

Before coming to NPR in 1993, she was a senior writer at Congressional Quarterly magazine. Fessler worked at CQ for 13 years as both a reporter and editor, covering tax, budget, and other news. She also worked as a budget specialist at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and was a reporter at The Record newspaper in Hackensack, NJ.

Fessler has a Masters of Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a bachelor's degree from Douglass College in New Jersey.

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Federal District Judge Upholds North Carolina's Sweeping Voter ID Law
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Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes
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Voters line up to cast their ballots on Super Tuesday, March 1, in Fort Worth, Texas. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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What Keeps Election Officials Up At Night? Fear Of Long Lines At The Polls
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In A High-Rent World, Affordable And Safe Housing Is Hard To Come By
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Terrell Walker says that her apartment in Washington, D.C., has mold and problems with heating and old appliances. She's been withholding rent in an effort to get her landlord to fix up the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Low-Income Renters Squeezed Between Too-High Rents And Subpar Housing
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Meagen Limes of Washington, D.C., is struggling to pay rent on the apartment where she lives with her 4-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Living From Rent To Rent: Tenants On The Edge Of Eviction
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The Landlord and Tenant Branch of Superior Court for the District of Columbia is where landlords in the city sue tenants, usually for not paying their rent. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Welcome To Rent Court, Where Tenants Can Face A Tenuous Fate
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Actor Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy, gaze at one another across a table in 1952. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Nancy Reagan, President's Fiercest Protector, Dies At 94
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A sign directs voters to a polling place during the Super Tuesday primary voting at a polling place in Arlington, Va. Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Election Officials Tackle Confusing Voter ID Laws In North Carolina
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The Super Food Express bus travels to schools in Mobile County, Ala., to ensure children are fed healthy meals when school is out of session. The bus is part of the USDA's summer food program, which President Obama says needs additional funding. USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Wall listens to violinist Fain perform during the Make Room concert at Wall's apartment in Annapolis, Md. The concert is a fundraiser to help Wall pay his rent and shine a light on the growing lack of affordable housing. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Modern Rent Parties Highlight The Need For Affordable Housing
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