Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR
Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Pam Fessler

Correspondent, National Desk

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.

In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category.

Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations.

Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton and the 1998 mid-term elections. She was NPR's chief election editor in 1996, and coordinated all network coverage of the presidential, congressional, and state elections. Prior to that role, Fessler was the deputy Washington editor and Midwest National Desk editor.

Before coming to NPR in 1993, she was a senior writer at Congressional Quarterly magazine. Fessler worked at CQ for 13 years as both a reporter and editor, covering tax, budget, and other news. She also worked as a budget specialist at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and was a reporter at The Record newspaper in Hackensack, NJ.

Fessler has a Masters of Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a bachelor's degree from Douglass College in New Jersey.

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A voter registration sign hangs near a table where residents fill out paperwork at a polling location during the presidential primary vote in Waukesha, Wis., on April 5. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Conservatives File Voter Registration Lawsuits That Liberals Say Are Blocking Votes

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Census Figures Show Poverty Rate Drops For Children And Adults

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A student receives her afternoon snack at Kingsley Elementary School in Los Angeles. Many of the students at the school in a low-income neighborhood of Los Angeles eat breakfast and lunch provided by the school. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Number Of Hungry U.S. Kids Drops To Lowest Level Since Before Great Recession

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Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik cares for her fiance, David Rector, who's trying to have his voting rights restored five years after a judge ruled that a traumatic brain injury disqualified him from casting a ballot in San Diego. Elliot Spagat/AP hide caption

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Disabled And Fighting For The Right To Vote

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FBI Warns State Election Offices To Be Wary Of Hackers

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North Carolina State University students wait in line to vote in the primaries in Raleigh. North Carolina is one of several states with voting laws in front of the courts. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Virginia Gov. McAuliffe Restores Voting Rights For 13,000 Felons

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Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Welfare 'As We Know It' Ended In 1996. Did It Help Or Hurt?

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Trump Calls On Supporters To Monitor Polling Places On Election Day

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A poll worker prepares a voting machine before the South Carolina primary. The recent hacking of the Democratic Party databases has raised questions about potential issues with voting systems. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Hacking An Election: Why It's Not As Far-Fetched As You Might Think

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Federal Appeals Court Throws Out North Carolina's Voter ID Law

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