Sikh pilgrims stream into the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, on Nov. 10. Devout Sikhs from all over India and the world come to Amritsar by the tens of thousands every day — adding to an already sizable carbon footprint. So city and temple officials have joined an environmental group to learn how to incorporate environmentally friendly practices. Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images

In India, Spreading A Green Gospel Among Pilgrims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142506560/142583944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pakistan, India Trade Deal Sprouts New Possibility

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142010912/142010887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Indian students pose with the supercheap Aakash tablet computers, which they received during the Oct. 5 product launch in New Delhi. The Indian government intends to deliver 10 million tablets to college students across India at a subsidized price of $35. Gurinder Osan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Gurinder Osan/AP

Will Cheap Computer Bridge India's Digital Divide?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141944012/141952269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Newborns lie together at a district women's hospital in Allahabad, in India's most populous state of Uttar Pradesh. Fifty-one babies are born in India every minute.

Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

toggle caption Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

When Humans Hit 7 Billion, Will It Happen In India?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141811419/141812234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stone elephants line a newly inaugurated park dedicated to Dalit, or lower caste, leaders in a suburb of New Delhi, India. Mayawati, a politician known as the "Dalit queen," says previous governments did nothing to honor the leaders who fought for Dalit rights.

Pankaj Nangia/AP hide caption

toggle caption Pankaj Nangia/AP

In India, Once-Marginalized Now Memorialized

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141775668/141788065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Tripoli, Libya, women celebrate the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi's regime and call for a strengthening of women's rights, Sept. 2. After playing large but largely unsung roles during the uprising, women are now seeking a greater political role.

Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

toggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Post-Revolution, Libyan Women Seek Expanded Roles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141037471/141056116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Abdel Hakim Belhaj (center left), a prominent militia commander, walks with Transitional National Council Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil in Tripoli on Sept. 10. The battle to oust Moammar Gadhafi produced a number of leaders who will have to work together to form a new government. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

toggle caption Francois Mori/AP

Libya's Newest Concern: Looming Political Battles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140959765/140959742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Misrata Recovering From Libya's Bloody Battles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140834487/140834472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Libyans flee on foot along the main road heading west, away from Sirte, on Tuesday. Sirte, cut off from the rest of the country, is the last major town controlled by forces loyal to toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Gaia Anderson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Gaia Anderson/AP

In Libya, Some Just Learning Of Gadhafi's Downfall

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140738547/140750831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Libyan rebels pray before going out on patrol outside the port city of Misrata on April 30. Religion plays a major role in Libyan life, and Islamist groups want to be part of the new government. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images

What Role Will Islamists Play In Libya?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140665324/140675790" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Libya's Oil Production To Resume Shortly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140527386/140527369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

British, French Leaders Visit Tripoli

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140513404/140513387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fighter loyal to the Transitional National Council sits with money that has been donated to pay fighters at a checkpoint outside Bani Walid, Libya, on Monday. It was widely feared that ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters spirited away much of the country's wealth. But those fears have yet to materialize, as Libya's central bank holdings appear to remain largely intact. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Libya's Bankers: Treasury Protected From Plunder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140473747/140466992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Libyan rebel fighters raid a house in Tripoli on Tuesday as they search for supporters of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. The rebel leadership is trying to get various rebel factions to work together to create a new government and security force. Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images

Libyan Rebels Vie For Key Posts In Tripoli

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140301596/140311871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rebels Move To Find Gadhafi, Secure Libya

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140242042/140242068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript