Corey Flintoff 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Corey Flintoff 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Corey Flintoff

International Correspondent, Moscow, Russia

Corey Flintoff is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. His journalism career has taken him to more than 50 countries, most recently to cover the civil war in Libya, the revolution in Egypt and the war in Afghanistan.

After joining NPR in 1990, Flintoff worked for many years as a newscaster during All Things Considered. In 2005, he became part of the NPR team covering the Iraq War, where he embedded with U.S. military units fighting insurgents and hunting roadside bombs.

Flintoff's reporting from Iraq includes stories on sectarian killings, government corruption, the Christian refugee crisis and the destruction of Iraq's southern marshes. In 2010, he traveled to Haiti to report on the massive earthquake its aftermath. Two years before, he reported on his stint on a French warship chasing pirates off the coast of Somalia.

One of Flintoff's favorite side jobs at NPR is standing in for Carl Kasell during those rare times when the venerable scorekeeper takes a break from Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Before NPR, Flintoff served as the executive producer and host of Alaska News Nightly, a daily news magazine produced by the Alaska Public Radio Network in Anchorage. His coverage of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill was recognized with the 1989 Corporation for Public Broadcasting Award.

In 1977, Flintoff got his start in public radio working at at KYUK-AM/TV, in Bethel, Alaska. KYUK is a bilingual English-Yup'ik Eskimo station and Flintoff learned just enough Yup'ik to announce the station identification. He wrote and produced a number of television documentaries about Alaskan life, including "They Never Asked Our Fathers" and "Eyes of the Spirit," which have aired on PBS and are now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution.

He tried his hand at commercial herring fishing, dog-mushing, fiction writing and other pursuits, but failed to break out of the radio business.

Flintoff has a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a master's degree from the University of Chicago, both in English literature. In 2011, he was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Drexel University.

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Russian workers threw contraband peaches off a truck outside the city of Novozybkov on Aug. 7. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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LGBT activists in Kazakhstan hoped international attention from hosting the Winter Olympics might help their cause. Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Eugene Kaspersky, founder and chief executive officer of Kaspersky Lab, at his office in Moscow last Dec. 9. Kaspersky and his firm have ties to the Russian government, but say that should not be cause for concern in the West, where the company's cybersecurity software is widely used. Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr./Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Russia has strict rules on dispensing painkillers. Family members say some cancer patients killed themselves because they could not obtain the medicine and the pain was too great. Andy Baker/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Police search the area near a destroyed billboard reading "Crimea is Ukraine!" following an explosion in Odessa on June 12. Alexey Kravtsov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainian national guardsmen practice protecting and recovering wounded comrades as American military trainers watch. Corey Flintoff/NPR hide caption

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Mikheil Saakashvili (center) is the former president of Georgia, which waged a brief war with Russia in 2008. Last month, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko (left) named Saakashvili the governor of Odessa, the port city in Ukraine, a country waging its own battle with Russia. The two are shown in Odessa on May 30. Mykola Lazarenko/Presidential Press Service Pool/AP hide caption

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Visitors check out the Soviet-era metro cars exhibited at the Partizanskaya subway station in Moscow, as part of festivities marking the subway system's 80th anniversary. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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