Libyan Leader Faces More Setbacks
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Fierce Clashes Drive People Out Of Libya's Capital
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People fleeing Libya carry their luggage to the Tunisian border post in Jdir on Wednesday. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Tunisia Embraces A Stream Of Refugees From Libya
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Peaceful Opposition Movement Mobilized In Morocco
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An Iraqi shop owner sells groceries in Baghdad. World Bank President Robert Zoellick says the high cost of food is an "aggravating factor" behind the unrest in the Middle East. Ali al-Saadi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Impact Of Rising Food Prices On Arab Unrest
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At the White House on Friday, President Obama said the U.S. now expects "nothing less than genuine democracy" in Egypt. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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U.S. Struggles To Balance Its Interests In Egypt
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Last January, CIA Director Leon Panetta (left) met with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at the presidential palace in Cairo. Amr Nabil /AP hide caption

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U.S. Intel Officials On Edge As They Watch Egypt
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President Obama and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, seen here in August 2009, have little to laugh about now. The protests and uncertainty in Egypt pose a foreign policy dilemma for Washington: stick with the Mubarak government or back the pro-democracy movement? Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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In Egyptian Uprising, A Tale Of Two Risks For U.S.
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Anti-government protesters react in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Should Investors Be More Worried About Egypt?
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Analysts talk at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, an element of the Department of Homeland Security based in Arlington, Va. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dilemma For U.S.: Does Net Freedom Trump Security?
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An image grab taken from Egyptian state television shows Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (left) speaking with his new Vice President Omar Suleiman (center) and Chief of Staff Sami Anan during a visit to the military operations center in Cairo on Sunday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Plan To Replace Hosni Mubarak May Be In The Works
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Assange, Manning: Parallels, But Links Unclear
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A coal-fired power plant near Weisswasser, Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyberthieves Target European Carbon Credit Market
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President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama greet Chinese President Hu Jintao at the state dinner at the White House on Wednesday. Hu's red carpet treatment in Washington this week underscores his country's status as the top U.S. economic rival. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Is China's Economy Already No. 1?
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